National Geographic

@natgeo

Experience the world through the eyes of National Geographic photographers.
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photo by @chamiltonjames / Charlie Hamilton James - This week I have been working with a brave and dedicated… read more
photo by @chamiltonjames / Charlie Hamilton James - This week I have been working with a brave and dedicated group of fire fighters in the eastern Amazon. They protect the indigenous reserve of Arariboia, home to the Awã and the Guajaja people, from forest fires. Fire season here is just coming to an end as the first rains of the wet season arrive. This year has been a very busy time for the fire fighters who have tackled huge blazes in the territory. Armed with minimal equipment they have developed techniques and strategies to contain the fires but many get out of hand and burn huge areas of forest. The forest here is special; it is home to isolated Awã - tribes living in voluntary isolation from the outside world; often romantically described as ‘uncotacted’. The aim of the fire fighters is to protect their land and the land of the isolated people who’s rights they value enormously - even though they have never met them. The crews are made up of indigenous Guajaja and IBAMA fire fighters. This shot shows a manioc field on fire - many people in the area clear cut forest to grow manioc, they then burn the area to clear the dead wood before planting crops. This often gets out of control and burns the surrounding forest. Fortunately in this instance the fire was kept under control. On assignment for @natgeo in Brazil | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Video @ladzinski / Shadows retreating back as the moon rises over Bolivia’s #eduardoabaroa national reserve.… read more
Eduardo Avaroa Andean Fauna National Reserve
Video @ladzinski / Shadows retreating back as the moon rises over Bolivia’s #eduardoabaroa national reserve. This reserve extends roughly 1.7 million acres and sits at an elevation ranging from 13,800 feet to 17,000 feet. | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @BrianSkerry. Harp Seal Pups Kissing!  Two harp seal pups meet each other on the pack ice of… read more
Gulf of Saint Lawrence
Photo by @BrianSkerry.Harp Seal Pups Kissing!  Two harp seal pups meet each other on the pack ice of Canada’s Gulf of St. Lawrence, touching noses as they sniff one another. Pups are generally born in this region during February, spending about two weeks nursing from their mothers before heading off into the frigid arctic waters on their own. The decline of sea ice over the last decade has created a serious crisis for these animals, as pup mortality rates have increased substantially. If the climate continues to warm and sea ice disappears, the future is uncertain for this species.To see more ocean wildlife, and to learn more about my experiences photographing for National Geographic, follow me, @BrianSkerry, on Instagram.@thephotosociety @natgeocreative#harp #seal #pup #canada #arctic #ice #photooftheday #nationalgeographic #natgeo #harpseal #climatechange #globalwarming #instagood #followme #follow #saveouroceans #ocean #photography #travelphoto #wonderlust #travelphotographer | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Image by @joelsartore | Right now, in Central and Southern Mexico, monarch butterflies are finishing… read more
Image by @joelsartore | Right now, in Central and Southern Mexico, monarch butterflies are finishing their incredible 3,000 mile and 4-generation journey from the US and Canada and are settling in for the winter. This generation of monarchs will live happily in these warm climates for six to eight months until it is time to begin the whole journey again. They will then migrate back north for the summer, landing on milkweed to lay eggs for a new generation, and providing pollination to many plants along the way. With butterfly season coming to a close, we are wrapping up our #pollinatormonday campaign. Thank you so much for following us on our journey this summer! Pollinator Mondays may be coming to an end, but helping pollinators should never stop. Continue to support pollinators and help save the Great Monarch Migration by planting milkweed in the summer months, avoiding mowing before fall, and choosing to practice organic lawn and garden care. You can always click the link in my bio to freshen up your knowledge about pollinators and to learn more about how to help. Thank you for choosing to be a #pollinantorhero! Let’s continue to #savetogether!..#pollinators #butterflies #monarchs #migration #nature #conservation #biodiversity #animalfacts #wildlife #wildlifephotography #natgeo #savetogether #photoark | © instagram.com/natgeo
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@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto Nature is perfection. It gives us the air we breathe and the water… read more
@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto  Nature is perfection. It gives us the air we breathe and the water we all need for our life. My @natgeo jaguar story come out soon in the December issue of National Geographic Magazine! and LOOK for our @ngwild Big Cat Week show filmed with @bertiegregory in Dec. 2017.Here is a cub trying to play with her mom - who is having nothing to do with it.Jaguars are the 3rd largest of the big cats. Found from US / Mexico border to northern Argentina. Jaguars have rebounded in this area where 95% of the land is privately owned. In the past many ranchers would kill the cats when they ate their cattle. Today in this area tourism brings in much more money to the local economy than cattle ranching. So the jaguar population is increasing. But revenge killings of jaguars happen close to this area and all throughout the jaguars range. Also poaching for skins, bones and teeth is growing for the first time since the 1970’s to feed the demand for Asian Traditional Medicine and luxury items from endangered species. “When the buying stops, the killing can too.” @wildaid My first story with big cats was the 1st @natgeo Jaguar story 20 years ago! It has changed my life working with the magical and magnificent cats of the world. Animals have emotions just like we have.Forests provide us with up to 50% of the oxygen we breathe - oceans the rest. They give us 75% of the fresh water.If we can save the forest of the Amazon and other areas in Central and South America for the JAGUAR and Puma. The forests of Central Africa for the leopard, lion, elephants etc. And the forests of South Asia for the Tigers and Leopards. If you save the top predator in any ecosystem you save everything that lives with them.So if - We Save Big Cats we can help Save Ourselves.  Please visit CauseAnUproar.org to find out other ways to become involved to save big cats!#follow me @stevewinterphoto to see more images from my work with @natgeo and Thanks!! @stevewinterphoto @natgeo @nglive #nglive @natgeochannel @natgeowild @thephotosociety  @natgeocreative  #fursforlife  #BCI #bigcatsintiative  @africanparksnetwork @jaguar #jaguar @bertiegregory | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Video by @BertieGregory. A waterfall deep in the heart of the unexplored Chiribiquete National Park.… read more
Video by @BertieGregory. A waterfall deep in the heart of the unexplored Chiribiquete National Park. I shot this from a helicopter whilst accompanying a team from Fundacion Herencia, an incredible group of people doing real 21st century exploration. It’s very humbling to know that there are still places on this planet we know almost nothing about. This massive area boasts one of the largest protected areas of jaguar habitat in the world. It is also home to ancient paintings of jaguars, representing some of the earliest evidence of humans in South America. But despite its remoteness, it is still under threat. We owe a huge thanks to Parks Colombia and the Colombian Ministry of Culture for their support. Stay tuned for @stevewinterphoto ‘s upcoming jaguar story for @natgeo Magazine and our TV show for @natgeowild. Follow @bertiegregory for more wildlife adventures! | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photograph by Michael Yamashita @yamashitaphoto - The eyes of Kathakali: there are 9 facial gestures… read more
Kochi, India
Photograph by Michael Yamashita @yamashitaphoto - The eyes of Kathakali: there are 9 facial gestures that dancers perform in the classic Indian dance drama of Kerala. Totally mesmerizing to watch them dance with their eyes, each expression evoking a different human emotion. Guess which is this? #kathakali #eyes  #dance #dancers #kerela #india @natgeocreative | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @ciriljazbec / Entering Siorapaluk, one of the northernmost settlements on the planet, after… read more
Greenland
Photo by @ciriljazbec / Entering Siorapaluk, one of the northernmost settlements on the planet, after taking five plane flights, one helicopter flight and a several hour dog sled ride over the sea ice. Inhabited by a few families the village faces a serious decline in population. Peter Simigag, a hunter from Qaanaaq, who is encircled by dogs, is visiting one of them. Follow more from my Arctic journey @ciriljazbec #Arctic #Greenland #northernmost #settlement | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by: @renaeffendiphoto // A young birch tree pushes through the floorboards of a second floor inside… read more
Chernobyl, Ukraine
Photo by: @renaeffendiphoto // A young birch tree pushes through the floorboards of a second floor inside a school sports gymnasium in the abandoned city of Prypiats. As a result of the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986 and the subsequent radioactive fallout the entire population of Prypiats was evacuated and never returned home. Nature has reclaimed the city that was previously home to over 40,000 people. Vegetation grows inside homes, wolves, deer and wild boar roam the empty streets. For more human interest stories follow @renaeffendiphoto @natgeocreative @thephotosociety #nature #environment #nuclear #disaster #chernobyl #ukraine #trees | © instagram.com/natgeo
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photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - the skeleton of a dodo (raphus cucullatus) from the… read more
photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - the skeleton of a dodo (raphus cucullatus) from the 16th century (or possibly earlier) During the month of September in the year 1598 a flotilla of ships belonging to the Dutch East India Company drew close to a mysterious island far out in the Indian Ocean. As far as anyone knows, no human had ever set foot on it, those who came ashore found themselves in a land of reptiles and birds: the only mammals were those that could fly or swim there. Birds were everywhere, one in particular stood out - a large fat creature equipped with an enormous beak; and so, man’s relationship with the dodo began. As we now know the relationship didn’t go well for the dodo. After many months at sea the birds presented a tasty alternative to the sailors usual diet; the birds couldn’t fly, they had no need to, they had no predators, so the catching was comparatively easy. With man came dogs, cats, monkeys, pigs, and rats. All preyed rapaciously on the birds and their eggs. By the year 1680 (or possibly earlier) the dodo was gone. All that was left were one or two poorly stuffed examples, a series of paintings, most of them produced by a dutch artist called Roelandt Savery, and a few written descriptions. So, less than 100 years after its discovery, the dodo passed into history. Over the next two centuries the dodo became something of a footnote in the tale of natural history. Some naturalists even began to deny that it had existed. Then during the 1860’s a great collection of bones arrived in London, all of them from the dodo. These had been found in a marsh on Mauritius by a school master, Charles Clarke. He had sent workers into water at the centre of the marsh, about 3ft deep, where bones had begun to turn up. Feeling with their naked feet they discovered the bones of many dodo’s. From these bones London’s Natural History Museum was able to assemble an almost complete skeleton. A very few reasonably complete skeletons have, over the years been assembled from these bones. From this time onwards the dodo’s rise to become one of the the great icons of extinction was as unstoppable as its demise at the hand of man #everydayextinction | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @katieorlinsky: A curious teenage male polar bear investigating the hood of my truck in Kaktovik,… read more
Photo by @katieorlinsky: A curious teenage male polar bear investigating the hood of my truck in Kaktovik, an Inupiat native village in the Alaskan Arctic. Every fall after the community’s annual subsistence hunt of bowhead whales, more and more polar bears arrive to feed off the whale carcass' scraps and bones. Climate change has affected the migration and diet of polar bears, who have grown increasingly hungry as melting sea ice impairs their ability to hunt seals on the Arctic Ocean ice sheet. Meanwhile, scavenging so close to town brings its own set of challenges to both polar bears and the people of Kaktovik. With a steady stream of tourists and scientists coming to view and study the polar bears year after year, bears grow increasingly accustomed to interaction with humans-the most dangerous predator on the planet. | © instagram.com/natgeo
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A lone caver makes his way down the 600 foot shaft of the aptly named Fantastic Pit. Photo by @salvarezphoto… read more
Walker County, Georgia
A lone caver makes his way down the 600 foot shaft of the aptly named  Fantastic Pit. Photo by @salvarezphoto shot on assignment for @Natgeo.  Discovered in the late 1960s Fantastic Pit remains the deepest naturally occurring shaft in the United States. #cave | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @ciriljazbec / Unpredictability appears to be a new constant of the Greenlandic changing climate.… read more
Greenland
Photo by @ciriljazbec / Unpredictability appears to be a new constant of the Greenlandic changing climate. Earlier the Inuit hunters could just look at the weather and see how it is going to be the next few days. But today this is sometimes no longer possible because the change of the weather happens from day to day, or from hour to hour. The photo was taken in Upernavik, a small town in the northwest of Greenland, while I was waiting a couple of days for a delayed flight that was cancelled due to bad weather. I remember the town’s life was brought to a standstill while the power of nature took over. Follow more from my Arctic journey @ciriljazbec @natgeo #Arctic #Greenland #climatechange #seaice #melting | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @mmuheisen (Muhammed Muheisen) An unaccompanied refugee minor from Afghanistan sprays water… read more
Photo by @mmuheisen (Muhammed Muheisen) An unaccompanied refugee minor from Afghanistan sprays water on his friend while showering on a railway track behind the central station where they took refuge in Belgrade, Serbia. Border clampdowns since March 2016 and the tightening of the so-called Balkan route into the EU have stranded thousands of refugees in Serbia. For more photos of the refugee crisis follow @mmuheisen and @everydayrefugees #everydayrefugees #muhammedmuheisen | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Video by @FransLanting and @ChristineEckstrom Male chimpanzees are highly competitive and often fight… read more
Senegal
Video by @FransLanting and @ChristineEckstrom Male chimpanzees are highly competitive and often fight for dominance, but in the savanna woodlands of southern Senegal, where we tracked one group of chimps for six weeks on assignment for @NatGeo, we found a secret waterhole recently filled with rain. In the brutal summer heat it provided precious relief and squabbles were suspended for a temporary truce. This amazing behavior had never been captured before and it shows that even male chimps can get along when they want to. Images and stories from this project are also featured in our new book “Into Africa,” based on the NatGeo exhibition by the same name. Follow me @FransLanting for more unique chimp footage and learn what it was like to work with chimps in the wild. @natgeotravel @natgeocreative @thephotosociety #ape #chimp #wildlife #wildlifephotography #assignment #challenge #wild #waterhole #men #competition #cooperation #peace | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photograph by @thomaspeschak Small and medium sized reef fish are still incredibly abundant in the waters… read more
Photograph by @thomaspeschak Small and medium sized reef fish are still incredibly abundant in the waters off D'arros and St Joseph islands in the Seychelles. It is healthy marine environments like this that are the prerequisite for large numbers of sharks and others predators to flourish. Unpublished photo from my @natgeo magazine story on island conservation in #seychelles. In partnership with @saveourseasfoundation.For more images from this often overlooked corner of the Indian Ocean #follow @thomaspeschak@thephotosociety @natgeocreative #underwater #ocean #sharks #adventure #nature | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo and caption by @petekmuller. The Clearwater River winds through the Nez Perce-Clearwater National… read more
Clearwater National Forest
Photo and caption by @petekmuller. The Clearwater River winds through the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forest in the North American state of Idaho. The water moves swiftly over rocks yet remains gin-clear for a great many miles. I stop occasionally, collect my fly fishing rod and make a few casts along the banks. I never understood how disconnected I was from the rhythms of nature until I endeavored to catch fish with a fly. For over a year, I paid little mind to the basic disposition and desires of the fish I hoped to catch. I understood little about the entomology of the rivers in which I fitfully cast my line. I thought less about where fish might be or how I might entice them. I assumed that--by matter of miracle--a fish would simply take the fly. For longer  than I care to admit, not a single one did. I could almost hear them laughing. As I explore issues related to humans and the natural world, fly fishing offers me perspective and humility. Follow @petekmuller on this unfolding journey for @natgeo. #idaho #clearwater #USA #nature #fishing #flyfishing #AmericanWest | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Image by @markosian | A family in Akhaltsikhe, a small city in Georgia's southwestern region of Samtskhe-Javakheti,… read more
Georgia (country)
Image by @markosian | A family in Akhaltsikhe, a small city in Georgia's southwestern region of Samtskhe-Javakheti, prepare for dinner. #georgia | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Video by @renan_ozturk // The last few days we followed young Yurok members of the #AncestralGuard on… read more
Yurok Reservation
Video by @renan_ozturk // The last few days we followed young Yurok members of the #AncestralGuard on their indigenous river (the Klamath) in traditional redwood dugout canoes – for a feature documentary on Native American food sovereignty. ~More knowledge from @gatherfilm director @mrsanjayr -  The ancestral guard is a small group of young coastal Californian indigenous men and women committed to reversing the silent genocide of their people. Focusing on reestablishing ancient foodways for health and strength as well as revitalizing the appetite for ancestral culture among youth, the ancestral guard understands that to continue as indigenous people, minds need to be transformed not just on reservations but off. Everyone has a different definition of what it really means to be indigenous - but for these youth on the Klamath, they say to be indigenous is to love their river. And that allows all coastal natives who love the Klamath to be considered as Yurok in the mind of these kids. They continue by saying that to love their river means to love the ocean and mother earth because all three systems are intrinsically connected. With climate change they have seen that no matter how much they try to protect the river, greater forces threatening to destroy everything they hold dear.  @daharbfilm @jlg.ensaw @petergensaw @frau_mit_katze @tanya_meillier @sterlinharjo @chzamag @taylorfreesolo @fndi303 @siixuutesna @taracduggan @gretacaruso @kim_baca1 #klamath #yurok #eureka #california #indigenous #nativeheritage | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Video by @BertieGregory. A helicopter carrying a team of archeologists and biologists deep into the heart… read more
Video by @BertieGregory. A helicopter carrying a team of archeologists and biologists deep into the heart of the unexplored Chiribiquete National Park. The team from Fundacion Herencia are doing real 21st century exploration. It’s very humbling to know that there are still places on this planet we know almost nothing about. This massive area boasts one of the largest protected areas of jaguar habitat in the world. It is also home to ancient paintings of jaguars, representing some of the earliest evidence of humans in South America. But despite its remoteness, it is still under threat. We owe a huge thanks to Parks Colombia and the Colombian Ministry of Culture for their support. Stay tuned for @stevewinterphoto ‘s upcoming jaguar story for @natgeo Magazine and our TV show for @natgeowild. Follow @bertiegregory for more wildlife adventures! | © instagram.com/natgeo
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The Cuban locals call him Tito. I call him big, curious and slightly intimidating; especially at night… read more
The Cuban locals call him Tito. I call him big, curious and slightly intimidating; especially at night when he approached @andy_mann and I out of the mangroves.  He seemed to be attracted to my video lights which were naturally attached to my camera which was six inches in front of my face. I would not trade moments like this for anything. #follow our efforts on @sea_legacy as we are #turningthetide. In Cuba we are celebrating Jardines De La Reina National Marine Park and—through our visual storytelling—we will share with the world what an ocean looks like when you protect it. On #assignment with @sea_legacy and @aluciaproductions with @cristinamittermeier @mdalio @samkretch @iankellet_story. Thank you to the Dalio Ocean Initiative for supporting our ocean conservation vision.  #nature #mpa #naturelovers #embraceyourfear #ignoreyourgutinsinct #gratitude | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo @Ladzinski / Last kiss of light on Bolivia’s #uyunisaltflats. The #uyuni is the largest salt flat… read more
Salar De Uyuni - Bolivia
Photo @Ladzinski / Last kiss of light on Bolivia’s #uyunisaltflats. The #uyuni is the largest salt flat on earth, perched at roughly 12,000ft elevation. The fluctuation in temperatures is dramatic, the hot days are filled with deceiving mirages followed by below zero temps at night. To see what the road through the salt flats looks like, check out my feed @Ladzinski | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @ciriljazbec / Anton Aronsen, an Inuit hunter, spotted me while I was exploring Aappilattoq,… read more
Greenland
Photo by @ciriljazbec / Anton Aronsen, an Inuit hunter, spotted me while I was exploring Aappilattoq, a small settlement in northwestern Greenland, on my first day of a visit and invited me over for a lunch. His house is like any other Greenlandic house painted in vivid colours, so locals can notice them easier when returning home from hunting or fishing. You can find a portrait of Anton inside his house and follow more from my Arctic journey @ciriljazbec and @natgeo #Greenland #Arctic #Inuit #settlement | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @pedromcbride // Early snow dusts the last colors of fall in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado.… read more
Basalt, Colorado
Photo by @pedromcbride // Early snow dusts the last colors of fall in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. #chasingrivers #nature | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @jimmy_chin It's about your point of view. @conrad_anker has a good one. Purcell Mountains,… read more
Photo by @jimmy_chin It's about your point of view. @conrad_anker has a good one. Purcell Mountains, British Columbia. | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @christian_foto Students in Bolívar Square, Bogotá, Colombia. The Bolívar Square is the… read more
Bogotá, Colombia
Photo by @christian_fotoStudents in  Bolívar Square, Bogotá, Colombia. The Bolívar Square  is the main square of the Colombian capital Bogotá. The square, previously called Plaza Mayor until 1821 and Plaza de la Constitución, is located in the heart of the historical area of the city and hosts a statue of Simón Bolívar, sculpted in 1846 by the Italian Pietro Tenerani, which was the first public monument in the city.Photo by @christian_foto#bogota #colombia #girls | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Image by @joelsartore | Oblong-winged katydids like these at the @auduboninstitute Insectarium in New… read more
Image by @joelsartore | Oblong-winged katydids like these at the @auduboninstitute Insectarium in New Orleans occasionally hatch out in vibrant color variants in nature, though anything but green is usually spotted immediately and eaten by predators. These insects can be found among forests, shrubs and weeds throughout most of the Eastern United States. The @AudubonInstitute Insectarium has been a leader in breeding these color variants.To see an up close portrait of a pink katydid, follow @joelsartore...#insects #bugs #katydids #colorful #vibrant #weirdanimals #strangeanimals #weirdnature #nature #conservation #biodiversity #animalfacts #wildlife #wildlifephotography #natgeo #savetogether #photoark | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photograph by George Steinmetz @geosteinmetz Dream-like Islands in the lake of the Rapa Delta in Sweden’s… read more
Photograph by George Steinmetz @geosteinmetz  Dream-like Islands in the lake of the Rapa Delta in Sweden’s Sarek National Park.  This is one the few areas north of the Arctic Circle where the boreal forest has deciduous trees, like these birches surrounded by waters stained blue with glacial till. To see more of this magical place, go to @geosteinmetz | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @BrianSkerry. A basking shark swims with its giant mouth open, feeding on plankton in the nutrient-rich… read more
Cape Cod
Photo by @BrianSkerry.A basking shark swims with its giant mouth open, feeding on plankton in the nutrient-rich waters off of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The second largest fish in the sea - after whale sharks - this species can reach lengths of up to 30 feet long, weighing almost 5,000 pounds. Basking sharks are a close cousin of the whale shark, and can be found throughout much of the Northern Hemisphere. Both basking sharks and whale sharks are protected in certain territorial waters, with basking sharks listed in Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), meaning that – though the species is not necessarily threatened with extinction – trade must be controlled in order to protect their survival. Earlier this week, the whale shark was upgraded to Appendix I, meaning that the species is now recognized internationally as vulnerable to extinction. To learn more about these magnificent animals, and to see more underwater photography, follow me, @BrianSkerry, on Instagram. @thephotosociety @natgeocreative#basking #shark #cape #cod #giant #marine #biology #underwater #photography #social #vulnerable #conservation #save #sharks #natgeo #photooftheday #followme #capecod #underwaterphoto #underwaterphotography #instagood #follow #baskingshark #whaleshark | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @williamodaniels for @natgeo. Sadic Waswa, a Makerere University researcher in a joint project… read more
Photo by @williamodaniels for @natgeo.Sadic Waswa, a Makerere University researcher in a joint project with Chicago's Field Museum of Natural History and a student examines a freshly-caught bat near Mount Morungole in northern Uganda. Wildlife “bio-prospecting,” as scientists call it, includes the hunt for microscopic organisms that could prove crucial in developing new vaccines. In 2016 and early 2017, I travelled to 7 countries in Africa, Asia and Europe to work on the story Why Vaccines Matter published in the current issue of National Geographic Magazine. | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photograph by @lucasfogliaphoto. A face emerges as hot lava flows from the Kīlauea Volcano, the world's… read more
Hawaii
Photograph by @lucasfogliaphoto. A face emerges as hot lava flows from the Kīlauea Volcano, the world's longest continuously erupting volcano, in Hawaii. | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @andreabruce The Indian village of Peepli Kheera in Uttar Pradesh knows me well. I have covered… read more
Photo by @andreabruceThe Indian village of Peepli Kheera in Uttar Pradesh knows me well. I have covered their village for other stories, and so, asking them personal questions about their bathroom habits and following them to the fields where they defecate in the open became somehow accepted. But it was their daily life that I wanted to share with you…it was published in the sanitation story in the August issue of National Geographic. This story is uncomfortable but possibly the largest health concern for humans in the world and a safety issue for women. Without proper sanitation it is difficult to find safe drinking water. People, especially young children, die. Last month I returned to Peepli Kheera and found many in the village now have outhouse latrines and have limited their practices of open defecation in the fields. #india #sanitation @noorimages #uttarpradesh | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo @Ladzinski / In the arctic the summer season is a time of plenty, a critical time for the locals… read more
Photo @Ladzinski / In the arctic the summer season is a time of plenty, a critical time for the locals to bulk up. If you’re a fox you’re also on the prowl looking for food to not only eat, but to stock pile. While on an expedition to southern greenland this last August we had a lot of encounters with #arcticFoxes. Initially they were curious but cautiously distant, however over time they became quite the little camp robbers, raiding our base camp for carelessly left out food, gloves, socks and tent stakes. They kept us on our toes to keep things buttoned up at camp and it was always fun watching these clever animals patrol their territory. | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo @michaelchristopherbrown A young Mbuti woman takes a break from preparing food outside her hut,… read more
Democratic Republic of the Congo
Photo @michaelchristopherbrownA young Mbuti woman takes a break from preparing food outside her hut, located near a small Bantu village in the Ituri Rainforest, Congo. Pygmies have moved towards larger population areas over the years due to social and environmental pressures such as increased park hunting restrictions, the decline of certain animal populations and the pull of modern conveniences. Though some Pygmy populations have become indentured to Bantu communities, Pygmy knowledge of the forest remains. There they are kings. My best memories with them include crawling through the rainforest while learning how they hunt with bow and arrow or by net, how they extracted water when not around rivers or streams (drinking from plant stems), how easily and quickly they navigated thick forest while using their voice to mimick certain animal sounds (they name the animal based on the sound) when communicating at a distance and more steathily during hunting. | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @williamalbertallard During my stay in Sicily in 1994 I was traveling along the southwestern… read more
Sicilia
Photo by @williamalbertallard During my stay in Sicily in 1994 I was traveling along the southwestern coast of Sicily with my assistant driving. I noticed a large flock of sheep moving across through an open field and the landscape had layers of light and then I saw the wild roses. I think they were roses. I asked Massimo to stop the car. I jumped out, grabbed a shoe mount strobe and jammed it onto my camera and quickly estimated an exposure that would light the flowers but no spread light over a wide area, just really on the warmth of the blossoms. This was with film, no back of the camera monitor to show me the result. I guess it comes with practice and back in those years I did a fair amount of mixing daylight and strobe. I got this one right.#followme @williamalbertallard for more images from Sicily and other assignments spanning five decades. #sicily #sicilia #siciliancoast #sheep #roses #wildflowers #filmphotography #williamalbertallard | © instagram.com/natgeo
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@RobertClarkphoto Danila, 14, the daughter of a rancher holds one of the baby #Alpaca's that she and… read more
@RobertClarkphoto Danila, 14, the daughter of a rancher holds one of the baby #Alpaca's that she and her brother are in charge of. The home that they living is made of adobe and sits in the #Cuchurro Valley below Huaylillas in the #Peruvian foothills to the #Andes at nearly 2300 meters above sea level, (7545 ft).#inca #Quechua | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - catching vulturine guineafowl for a research project,… read more
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - catching vulturine guineafowl for a research project, Mpala research centre, northern Kenya - The name of the vulturine guineafowl (Acryllium vulturinum) comes from its bald head and neck, which is similar to a vulture's.  They have a range throughout North East Africa and can be found in the grasslands, savannahs and scrublands of Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Tanzania and Uganda.Using their beak and claws to dig and scratch for food, vulturine guineafowl forage for fruit, grubs, insects, roots, seeds, tubers and vegetation.  Due to their dry environment, water is not always readily available to them but they can survive for long periods without drinking and are able to obtain all their liquid requirements from their food. Although they can fly well, vulturine guineafowl spend the majority of their time on the ground and prefer to flee from danger on foot rather than fly away.  They are able to call to each other over long distances, not only to warn of danger but also to call the flock together to roost.  Although they live together in large flocks, vulturine guineafowl can become aggressive and injure each other if food becomes scare or roosting sites become crowded.  This is not just limited to adult birds; chicks will also fight each other for food. There is currently very little information on the vulture guinea fowl as a species and researchers are currently observing the birds, their associations, and construction of social networks here at Mpala research centre, northern Kenya. To see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid and @natgeo #conservation #conserving #northernkenya #kenya | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Video by @joelsartore | It’s clear that the eyes of a spectral tarsier are exceptionally large. In fact,… read more
Video by @joelsartore | It’s clear that the eyes of a spectral tarsier are exceptionally large. In fact, they’re the largest, relative to body weight, of any mammal on Earth. Though their huge eyes help spectral tarsiers see at night, they are set in their skulls and immobile, much like an owl’s. Tarsiers compensate for their lack of eye mobility by being able to rotate their heads a full 180 degrees to check out their surroundings. This tiny primate weighs only as much as 20 pennies and can easily fit into the palm of a human hand.Spectral tarsier populations are in decline and the species is currently listed as Vulnerable on the #IUCN Red List. Their most significant threat by far is the degradation of their rainforest homes in Indonesia due to agriculture, illegal logging, and mining of limestone for cement manufacturing. To help save the tarsiers it is important to make sustainable purchasing choices and to continue supporting the conservation of rainforests.This spectral tarsier was photographed at Night Safari, part of Wildlife Reserves Singapore (@WRS.ig).To see a portrait of this adorable primate, follow @joelsartore...#spectraltarsier #NOTAPET #tarsier #nocturnalanimals #nocturnal #bigeyes #cute #adorable #cuteanimals #nature #conservation #biodiversity #animalfacts #wildlife #wildlifephotography #natgeo #savetogether #photoark | © instagram.com/natgeo
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photo by @chien_chi_chang October 29, 2017. A Rohingya family waddles through a rice paddy creek at Hakimpara… read more
photo by @chien_chi_chang October 29, 2017. A Rohingya family waddles through a rice paddy creek at Hakimpara refugee camp in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh. Since late August, Myanmar military has conducted clearance operations, burning over 200 Rohingya villages in Rakhine State. The operation has caused reportedly half a million Rohingya to flee to neighboring Bangladesh. #MagnumPhotos #RohingyaCrisis #cccontheroad | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @stephenwilkes. Italy pulls you in, and makes you feel welcomed and relaxed. As I went to explore… read more
Bellagio, Italy
Photo by @stephenwilkes. Italy pulls you in, and makes you feel welcomed and relaxed. As I went to explore the shores of Lake Como, in Bellagio I was drawn into the landscape and the sparkling waters that were being enjoyed by this family below.  No matter what the time of day, there’s always some magic on Lake Como. To see more images like this, please follow me @stephenwilkes.  #italy #lakecomo #bellagio #moments #landscape #lakelife #water #family #inspired | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @shonephoto (Robbie Shone) - On All Saints Day, rays of sunlight shine down through dark grey… read more
Photo by @shonephoto (Robbie Shone) - On All Saints Day, rays of sunlight shine down through dark grey clouds and light up the Austrian city of Innsbruck in the valley below. #smartphone | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photograph by Stefano Unterthiner @stefanounterthiner. An Eastern Grey kangaroo emerges from the dark… read more
Grampians, Victoria, Australia
Photograph by Stefano Unterthiner @stefanounterthiner.An Eastern Grey kangaroo emerges from the dark illuminated by the first morning light. Kangaroos are mostly active during night and rest in shade during middle of day. Shot on assignment for @natgeo.Follow me @stefanounterthiner to see more images from my @natgeo assignments. #dark #Australia #kangaroo #night #day #active | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @FransLanting A leopard is walking alone through thorny bushes with his whiskers extended without… read more
Botswana
Photo by @FransLanting A leopard is walking alone through thorny bushes with his whiskers extended without being seen by anyone except a remote camera. When I made this photo on assignment for @NatGeo almost 30 years ago, camera trap technology was in its infancy and cameras used film. It was months before I would see the results of my efforts. Since then my colleagues at NatGeo have pushed the state of the art with remote cameras. @michaelnicknichols has revealed forest elephants like nobody before him; @stevewinterphoto has outwitted cats around the world and they in turn have set the bar even higher for others. And we all pay homage to the wizardry of the engineers at NatGeo’s headquarters who developed the systems that made these images possible. This image is featured in our new book “Into Africa," which has just been released. It is based on our @NatGeo exhibition of the same name and features three decades of work in Africa. To see more images of wild Africa and to learn more about the book follow me @FransLanting. @natgeo @natgeocreative @thephotosociety #Africa #Botswana #Leopard #Gratitude #Wildlifephotography | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photograph by Howard Sochurek | This image of a Malayo-Polynesian woman surrounded by three small children,… read more
Photograph by Howard Sochurek | This image of a Malayo-Polynesian woman surrounded by three small children, one of them nursing, taken in Vietnam and published in National Geographic in 1965, inspired @paulmccartney to write the song "Lady Madonna" for the Beatles. You can learn the story behind the image that captivated him in our exclusive interview with Paul McCartney on natgeo.com (link in profile). | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Video by @pedromcbride // The Confluence of the Colorado and Little Colorado Rivers inside the Grand… read more
Marble Canyon, Arizona
Video by @pedromcbride // The Confluence of the Colorado and Little Colorado Rivers inside the Grand Canyon is considered sacred by many native tribes in the region. A gondola development, The Grand Escalade, was proposed to be constructed at this location but last night, in a long, passionate Navajo Tribal Council meeting, the tribe voted down the project which was proposed on their land, citing an array of economic, security and environmental concerns with the project. The grassroots opposition to the tram was led by a group of predominantly Navajo women, who want economic growth but “not there”, saying they don't want “a Disney-style development at our sacred places." To see more, follow @pedromcbride. Honored to film this historic mtg for my upcoming film #dustintheblood” coming out on 2018. @justinclifton  #grandcanyon #confluence #savetheconfluence #navajo #chasingrivers | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Video: @andy_mann // Cuba’s rare crocodiles are in trouble. Primarily preferring freshwater over saltwater,… read more
Jardines de la Reina
Video: @andy_mann // Cuba’s rare crocodiles are in trouble. Primarily preferring freshwater over saltwater, the Cuban Crocodile (critically endangered) is the most terrestrial of all croc species and it's slightly larger neighbor, the American Crocodile (seen here with @natgeo photographer @cristinamittermeier) is moving in. With healthier populations, and preferring saltier water, The American Crocodile's range is increasing as sea levels rise and Cuba’s freshwater habitats become more and more brackish. We had the unique opportunity to spend several days in the water with this beautiful specimen: gently floating along the surface, gliding through the seagrass or squeezing in and out of the mangroves. After learning our boundaries and taking the time to observe this individual's behavior, we were over-joyed to have such a close working proximity well into the evening hours. What an honor and privilege to be working in “Garden’s of the Queen” Cuba, have such a powerful experience and to be able to share it here with our followers. #TurningTheTide with @sea_legacy / Music by @davisharwellmusic ::::::::: Please #followme @andy_mann for a behind the scenes look at @natgeo photographer @paulnicklen and team diving into darkness the of night to film sharks at 100 feet. | © instagram.com/natgeo
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photo by @chamiltonjames / Charlie Hamilton James - Ayhua with her pet monkey. Ayhua is from the Awã,… read more
photo by @chamiltonjames / Charlie Hamilton James - Ayhua with her pet monkey. Ayhua is from the Awã, indigenous people of the eastern Brazilian Amazon. Her family came out of isolation in 1989 and she has lived in ‘contact’ ever since. Some Awã remain in voluntary isolation in the state of Maranhão and are considered highly vulnerable as threats to their land, particularly from logging, are considerable. The Awã like to keep wild animals as pets but seem to have a particular love of monkeys - many Awã women keep small tamarin monkeys as pets and often keep them on their heads. Shot on assignment for @natgeo | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Video by @joelsartore | The Wyoming toad is widely considered extinct in the wild, though the cause of… read more
Video by @joelsartore | The Wyoming toad is widely considered extinct in the wild, though the cause of their swift decline in the 1960’s and 70’s is still unknown. The only existing populations are living in captivity and among a small group within the Mortenson Lake National Wildlife Refuge in Wyoming which is maintained through introduction of captive-reared young. Sadly, this refuge is reportedly infected with the chytrid fungus, which is infamous for wiping out amphibian populations all over the world. The success of this extremely rare species is now completely dependent on the continuation of captive breeding programs.This Wyoming toad was photographed at @theomahazoo, where last year 900 tadpoles were produced and shipped to Wyoming to be released among the population currently residing in at Mortenson Lake.To see a portrait of this toad, check out @joelsartore...#wyomingtoad #toads #amphibians #extinctinthewild #rareanimals #omaha #nature #conservation #biodiversity #animalfacts #wildlife #wildlifephotography #natgeo #savetogether #photoark | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @noralorek for @natgeo. “We were many female soldiers. We were fighting for independence!” Rebecca… read more
Bidibidi Refugee Settlement, Northern Uganda
Photo by @noralorek for @natgeo. “We were many female soldiers. We were fighting for independence!” Rebecca Ameri, 75 from South Sudan was a soldier in Juba in the nineties and is now living in Bidibidi refugee settlement in Uganda..“Now I’m here with my 35 years old daughter who lost her husband. She has eight kids and collapsed of Malaria yesterday and was taken to the hospital. I had twelve children of which six died. Five are still in South Sudan. One of my sons I haven’t heard of since I came here, I don’t know if he’s still alive.”.In August the one millionth refugee from South Sudan entered Uganda in escape of the war. With most of the refugees being women and children and leaving during shootings at night their bedsheets called Milaya are often one of the few things they carry with them. The handmade patterns have been made in South Sudan and Sudan for generations and the tradition of the Milayas continues in what has become their temporary home while waiting for the war to end. Bidibidi is with its more than 270 000 people considered one of the worlds largest refugee settlements.For more pictures from 'The Milaya Studios' follow @noralorek | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @gabrielegalimbertiphoto /// Tanzania, somewhere between Ngorongoro and Serengeti - A group… read more
Photo by @gabrielegalimbertiphoto /// Tanzania, somewhere between Ngorongoro and Serengeti - A group of teenager Maasai newly circumcised.  The Maasai of Tanzania and Kenya have a series of rites of passage that accompany boys into adulthood. Every 10 or 15 years a new warrior class will be initiated into the tribe. Boys between the ages of 10 and 20 are brought together from all across the country. Dozens of houses are built that will serve as the place of initiation. The night before the ceremony, the boys sleep outside in the forest. At dawn, they return to the little makeshift homestead for a day of singing and dancing.  They drink a mixture of milk, cow’s blood, and alcohol and eat piles and piles of meat. After the festivities, boys who are of age (12-16) are ready to be circumcised. The Emuratare is the most important ceremony in the life of a Maasai boy. Once circumcised, the tribe will consider him a man, warrior, and protector of his village. As the young man makes his way to where the elders will circumcise him, friends and family members will taunt the boy by saying things like “If you flinch, we will disown you.” The Maasai value bravery of their warriors and the circumcision is a boy’s first way to prove his courage in the face of severe pain. It takes about 3 months for the circumcision to heal and during that time the young men wear black clothing and live in huts built by the women of the village. The Maasai boy is now warrior. #maasai #tanzania #child #rite #boys #serengeti #ngorongoro #adulthood | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @shonephoto (Robbie Shone) - 2014 Young Rolex Award laureate Dr. Francesco Sauro collects samples… read more
Photo by @shonephoto (Robbie Shone) - 2014 Young Rolex Award laureate Dr. Francesco Sauro collects samples of bio speleothem from the ceiling of Cueva de Los Cristales on Sarisarinama Tepui in Venezuela. This photograph is from a portfolio I made from inside caves on top of extremely remote tepuis (aka table-top mountains) in Venezuela. The scientists we were traveling with were looking for unique forms of bacteria that could help clinical microbiologists in studies into bacterial resistance to antibiotics. It was a fascinating assignment to a very remote and rarely visited part of our world. The diverse environment on top of these tepuis is like no other anywhere on planet Earth, as each tepui is different and home to a unique world. @natgeocreative | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @amivitale. Tufts of a mane are shown on an orphaned adolescent grevy's #zebra at @sararacamp… read more
Photo by @amivitale. Tufts of a mane are shown on an orphaned adolescent grevy's #zebra at @sararacamp in Northern Kenya. The conservatory is home to orphan giraffe, zebra, Kudu, Gerunuk, warthogs, and waterbuck who all will one day be released back into the wild to live as they were always meant to. Also known as the imperial zebra, the Grevy's is the most threatened of the three species of zebra. Compared with other zebras, it is tall, has large ears, and its stripes are narrower.Follow @amivitale to learn more about important conservation work.#DontLetThemDisappear @nrt_kenya @conservationorg @tusk_org @kenyawildlifeservice @sandiegozoo @natgeocreative @thephotosociety #savezebras #kenya #northernkenya #magicalkenya #whyilovekenya #africa #everydayafrica #photojournalism #amivitale | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photograph by @paulnicklen // It is rare that I have to desaturate a sky so I don’t get accused of over-cranking… read more
Cuba
Photograph by @paulnicklen // It is rare that I have to desaturate a sky so I don’t get accused of over-cranking the colors.  As I was photographing half and half splits in the Gardens of the Queen, Cuba, the guides started calling us back to the boat as a huge thunderhead was beginning to sweep over us.  I quickly grabbed this shot and made my way back to the boat in time to be heavily pelted by hail pellets. Lighting flashed all around us and it was a marvelous moment in nature.  This coral paradise in Cuba is truly healthy and is an indicator of what a habitat looks like when a country does the simple process of drawing a line around a map, protecting it and then enforcing.  In turn, tourism thrives.  We were there to celebrate this success story.  #followme on @paulnicklen to see how many sharks we were finding on our dives due to this protection.  #gratitude #nature #naturelovers #picoftheday #sunset #storm #ocean #beauty #explore #adventure #instagood | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo @michaelchristopherbrown Late afternoon near the entrance to the Valley of the Gods, Utah. This… read more
Valley of the Gods
Photo @michaelchristopherbrownLate afternoon near the entrance to the Valley of the Gods, Utah. This summer I drove through this desolate backcountry, filled with miles of incredible vistas, jagged buttes and mesas! Along with Monument Valley to the south, the region seemed to embody the rugged spirit of the west and the endless search for the frontier. | © instagram.com/natgeo
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The Long Road Home, based on Martha Raddatz’s best-selling book of the same name, is an eight-part chronicle… read more
The Long Road Home, based on Martha Raddatz’s best-selling book of the same name, is an eight-part chronicle of the harrowing "Black Sunday" ambush faced by Fort Hood's 1st Cavalry Division in Baghdad during the Iraq War. Tune in ‪Tuesday, November 7 at 9‬/8c on @NatGeoChannel. #LongRoadHome | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo and caption by @petekmuller. Descent in eastern Oregon. I’ve seen more of the world than I have… read more
Oregon
Photo and caption by @petekmuller. Descent in eastern Oregon. I’ve seen more of the world than I have my own country. For me, the American West has been a construct in my imagination—steeped in lore and sordid history. Growing up, my experiences were largely confined to the eastern states where my parents lived. My memories are of coastlines, tide pools and the comparatively modest White Mountains of New England. Much of my life in the US was spent in densely settled communities, where a small yard was considered “space.” To me, these vast, rugged expanses are awe-inspiring and they breathe new life into my imagination about American history. This exploration is fascinating, particularly after so many years away. Follow @petekmuller for ongoing visual observations on the natural world and our relationship with it. #Oregon #USA #thewest #PNW #America #nature | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @argonautphoto (Aaron Huey). Grand Gulch winds snake-like through 60 miles of sandstone on Cedar… read more
Photo by @argonautphoto (Aaron Huey). Grand Gulch winds snake-like through 60 miles of sandstone on Cedar Mesa in #BearsEarsNationalMonument, Utah.  Archeological finds in the Gulch reveal 15,000 years of human habitation. On assignment for Nat Geo this week looking at the heated battle over public lands and the administration’s desire to dramatically shrink the Monument’s boundaries.  The story is very complex and layered here on the ground.  Follow me at @argonautphoto for behind the scenes video and photos all this week. | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Video by @thomaspeschak I watched this male oceanic manta ray chase a female manta for over 10 minutes.… read more
Revillagigedo Islands
Video by @thomaspeschak I watched this male oceanic manta ray chase a female manta for over 10 minutes. The female however showed little interest and soon the amorous intentions of the male manta were firmly focused on me. Shot on assignment for @natgeo with @maresmexicanos and @mantatrust in the Revillegegedo Islands off Pacific Mexico. | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo @ladzinski / Professional climber @jessroskelley mid-leap-of-faith moment between basalt columns… read more
Photo @ladzinski / Professional climber @jessroskelley mid-leap-of-faith moment between basalt columns after a quick free-solo climb in Iceland. Formed from rapid cooling lava flows, these unique basalt columns are not only beautiful to look at, they’re perfect for climbing! | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by: @renaeffendiphoto An elephant herd enjoys a mud bath on the grounds of the Elephant Nature… read more
Photo by: @renaeffendiphoto An elephant herd enjoys a mud bath on the grounds of the Elephant Nature Park in Chiangmai, Thailand. These elephants were salvaged from being brutally exploited in logging. The older females in this herd have adopted and taken care of the orphaned young. For more stories follow me at @renaeffendiphoto @natgeocreative #elephant #nature #thailand #preservation #animals | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @mmuheisen (Muhammed Muheisen) Zainab, a 4-year-old refugee from Afghanistan, suffering from… read more
Photo by @mmuheisen (Muhammed Muheisen) Zainab, a 4-year-old refugee from Afghanistan, suffering from fever, rests on a bunk bed at a "one stop center" where she and her family have taken refuge near the Croatian border in Serbia. One stop centers offer food, medical support and assistance with documentation for refugees. For more photos of the refugee crisis follow @mmuheisen and @everydayrefugees #everydayrefugees #muhammedmuheisen | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @shonephoto (Robbie Shone) - Taking photographs underground often requires many assistants to… read more
Photo by @shonephoto (Robbie Shone) - Taking photographs underground often requires many assistants to help with the lighting and modelling. However, in some cases the manpower is not always available to me. This photograph of the beautiful '1000 Column Gallery' inside Imawari Yueta (cave) on top of Auyán Tepui in Venezuela captures one of those instances. In the pitch black before the flashguns and strobes went off I had to run through the columns, and get into position to create this self portrait.This photograph is from a portfolio I made from inside caves on top of extremely remote tepuis (aka table-top mountains) in Venezuela. The scientists we were traveling with were looking for unique forms of bacteria that could help clinical microbiologists in studies into bacterial resistance to antibiotics. It was a fascinating assignment to a very remote and rarely visited part of our world. The diverse environment on top of these tepuis is like no other anywhere on planet Earth, as each tepui is different and home to a unique world. @natgeocreative | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @CristinaMittermeier // Below me, the thick darkness of the Caribbean night clings to everything… read more
Jardines de la Reina
Photo by @CristinaMittermeier // Below me, the thick darkness of the Caribbean night clings to everything as a single Silky shark circles through the dim light of our dive boat.  People ask me if I ever get scared when working so close to animals like sharks.  The answer is, sometimes....but not on this night. To watch a video of me surrounded by these amazing and endangered creatures in the water and to learn more about their behavior, please #follow me at @CristinaMittermeier #TurningtheTide with @SeaLegacy, @andy_mann and @paulnicklen #oceanconservation #coral #reef #marineprotection #mpa #underwater #caribbean | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @BrianSkerry. Looking a little bit like a mermaid, a Florida Manatees swims through the clear… read more
Crystal River, Florida
Photo by @BrianSkerry. Looking a little bit like a mermaid, a Florida Manatees swims through the clear water of Crystal River in Florida. Manatees require warm water to survive - only capable of living in waters above 68 degrees - so they come into rivers such as this in the winter, as ocean waters turn colder. Aside from dropping temperatures, these manatees are vulnerable to a variety of other threats as well, including a loss of sea grass (their main source of food), red tide, and boat strikes. Through conservation efforts, we can ensure the survival of these creatures for years to come. To learn more about my experiences as a National Geographic photographer, and to see more underwater photography, follow me, @BrianSkerry, on Instagram. @thephotosociety @natgeocreative#florida #manatee #manatees #crystalriver #crystal #river #conservation #preservation #sea #cow #ocean #underwater #photography #national #geographic #nat #geo #redtide #red #tide #preservation #photooftheday #followme | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Video: @andy_mann // You can run but you can't hide. This is natural predation at its best. As the nutrient-rich… read more
Jardines de la Reina
Video: @andy_mann // You can run but you can't hide. This is natural predation at its best. As the nutrient-rich waters flood into the mangroves at high tide, sardines leave the protection of the roots to feed...and Horse-eye Jacks know it. Once the jacks have masterfully corralled up and confused the baitfish, it's dinner time. Filming this sequence with @paulnicklen (seen here filming) & @cristinamittermeier took several hours as we located the bait-ball and patiently waited for the tide to turn. The jacks came in like clockwork and it ended up being one of our favorite moments of the trip. You don't need more than 2 feet of water, mask and a snorkel to experience one of Cuba's best dives. Sardines and mangroves are crucial anchors to the health and diversity of the Caribbean and a reminder that our shallow coastlines are often the most important link in the chain. // #TurningTheTide @sea_legacy // Music by: @paperstarsmusic // Please #followme @andy_mann to learn more about Cuba's wildest seascapes and experience the Caribbeans best diving. | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @argonautphoto (Aaron Huey). Last night in #ValleyOfTheGods, #BearsEarsNationalMonument, Utah.… read more
Bears Ears National Monument
Photo by @argonautphoto (Aaron Huey). Last night in #ValleyOfTheGods, #BearsEarsNationalMonument, Utah.  Moonlight/Moonshadow.  Im on assignment for @natgeo all this week looking at the heated battle over public lands.  President Trump notified Senator Orin Hatch last week that he will be taking Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s advice and will be moving to shrink the Monument down to as little as 160,000 acres from 1.35 million.  What are your thoughts on Monument designations and/or reductions?  Follow me at @argonautphoto to see more images and behind the scenes from Bears Ears. | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Image by @joelsartore | Happy #pollinatormonday from the most charismatic of all pollinators: the honeybee.… read more
Image by @joelsartore | Happy #pollinatormonday from the most charismatic of all pollinators: the honeybee. The highly adaptable honeybee makes its home on every continent in the world, with the exception of Antarctica. This honeybee is lightly dusted with pollen, a result of visiting up to 2,000 flowers per day in the summertime. Honeybees are masters of communication and can alert other bees in their hive of the location of food and other resources by performing a complex movement called the “waggle dance”. The bee will “waggle” its body in relation to the resource’s location using the sun as an orientation point, and will have different movements and speeds for the distance and direction of the food. If the sun changes its location in the time it takes the bee to return to the hive, it knows to account for this change and will still convey correct information to its coworkers. The other workers in the hive read this information and can then work together to bring the resources back to the hive. The language of honeybees is regarded as the most complex and symbolic of all animal communications, and scientists still don’t fully understand the depth of its complexity. Austrian ethologist Karl von Frisch was the first to crack the code of the waggle dance and won the Nobel Prize for this eye-opening discovery in 1973. This little bee’s job is to forage all day, but despite all its hard work, a single honeybee will only produce about 1/12th of a teaspoon of honey in its entire lifetime. Honey packs a powerful punch, though, as just an ounce of it could fuel a single bee to fly all the way around the world. Now that’s efficiency!Follow @joelsartore for more incredible species!..#pollinatorhero #pollinator #bees #savethebees #honeybee #honey #bee #nature #conservation #biodiversity #animalfacts #wildlife #wildlifephotography #natgeo #savetogether #photoark | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Video by @bertiegregory. A pair of Red Sea Anemone fish swim around their host anemone off the coast… read more
Video by @bertiegregory. A pair of Red Sea Anemone fish swim around their host anemone off the coast of Gubal Island in the North Red Sea. These fish and their anemone provide the textbook example of a symbiotic relationship- one in which two species benefit from each other. The fish benefit as the anemone provides a protective home. The anemone benefits as the fish clean parasites and scare away anemone eating fish. Follow @bertiegregory for more wildlife adventures! | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photograph by @thomaspeschak Galapagos Marine Iguanas live on the edge and the difference between life… read more
Galápagos
Photograph by @thomaspeschak Galapagos Marine Iguanas live on the edge and the difference between life and death is a few degrees of temperature. The world's only ocean going lizards graze on cold water seaweeds. Increases in sea temperature due to climate change have detrimental effects on marine iguana populations. No seaweed=No iguanas. In this photograph a marine iguana scratches its nose on the claws of a dead and desiccated compatriot. If temperatures continue to warm these Galapagos icons could become the first to disappear.  The world's leading scientists are currently meeting at @darwinfound in the Galapagos to discuss how to safeguard and protect the island's unique fauna and flora from climate change. To find out more follow @darwinfound #climatechangegalapagos | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @williamalbertallard This was made at a small festival in the mountainous Basque town of Sare,… read more
Basque Country
Photo by @williamalbertallard This was made at a small festival in the mountainous Basque town of Sare, in 1967 while I was documenting the French and Spanish Basque country for National Geographic magazine. The picture was made at dusk, the time the French call “the time between dogs and wolves,” when it’s no longer really daylight and not yet truly dark. Several of the dancers are slightly blurred from their movement. The film I was using was not very fast but the slight movement adds to the feeling of the ambience. The fading light, the warmth of the colored light bulbs strung above, framing the scene. A solitary girl stands watching the dancers. It reminds me of some Impressionist paintings where dancers are shown in great intimacy. Not to say this is like a painting. No, it’s a photograph but one that might carry the feeling of the ambience as I remember it. My hope in making a picture is often that the viewer will feel what I felt when I was there.#followme @williamalbertallard for more images from the Basque Country and other assignments spanning five decades. #basque #basquecountry #festival #dance #dancing #mountain #dusk #filmphotography #williamalbertallard | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @FransLanting The giant succulent plants called quiver trees look more like sculptures than… read more
Namibia
Photo by @FransLanting The giant succulent plants called quiver trees look more like sculptures than living things. I highlighted their otherworldly appearance by painting them with flashlights against a starry night sky in the Namib Desert. This image is featured in our new book “Into Africa," which has just been released. It is based on our @NatGeo exhibition of the same name. To see more images of wild Africa and to learn more about the book follow me @FransLanting. @natgeotravel @natgeocreative @thephotosociety #Namibia #wonder #nature #succulent #aloe #creativity #naturephotography | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @shonephoto (Robbie Shone) - On top of Auyán Tepui in Venezuela, Imawari Yueta is one of the… read more
Photo by @shonephoto (Robbie Shone) - On top of Auyán Tepui in Venezuela, Imawari Yueta is one of the most spectacular caves on the planet! It is most unusual because it is formed inside quartzite. A very rare rock that contains caves. During our expedition, we explored its amazing network of beautiful galleries and stunning passages from an underground camp where we were based for four days. This unusual blue looking lake (pictured) was a fascinating highlight. A thin film of bacteria, partly covers the surface and this was an exciting sampling site for scientist Dr. Francesco Sauro and clinical microbiologist Dr. Hosam Zawawi. This photograph is from a portfolio I made from inside caves on top of extremely remote tepuis (aka table-top mountains) in Venezuela. The scientists we were traveling with were looking for unique forms of bacteria that could help clinical microbiologists in studies into bacterial resistance to antibiotics. It was a fascinating assignment to a very remote and rarely visited part of our world. The diverse environment on top of these tepuis is like no other anywhere on planet Earth, as each tepui is different and home to a unique world. @natgeocreative | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photograph by Michael Yamashita @yamashitaphoto - Blue alleyway in Kokilamedu Village where the fishermen… read more
Mahabalipuram, Tamil Nadu, India
Photograph by Michael Yamashita @yamashitaphoto - Blue alleyway in Kokilamedu Village where the fishermen paint their houses in rainbow colors. Women in sari walk to the well like models in a fashion show. Mahabalipuram, Tamil Nadu, India. @thesilkroadjourney #mahabalipuram #tamilnadu #India #blue @natgeocreative | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @renan_ozturk // words by @taylorfreesolo - Tony leaned back from the driver's seat and said… read more
Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park
Photo by @renan_ozturk // words by @taylorfreesolo -  Tony leaned back from the driver's seat and said to me in a slow paced and rhythmic 'matter of fact'ness... "They had no idea at the time. The government, they didn't even want the land. Nothing grows here. So in 1868, after twenty years of forcing thousands of our people to walk hundreds of miles to New Mexico, we became the first native nation to return to our home land with the treaty. But then the discoveries came... oil, gas, uranium. My father worked in the uranium mine. It wasn't just the men who got the cancer. It was their whole families. Because they would come home covered in that dust, go to their beds covered in that dust." Today, the 500 closed and abandoned uranium mines on the Navajo Nation are in various stages of cleanup through EPA Superfund Program. Monument Valley, pictured here, is a highly visited tourist destination given the incredible beauty of this Martian landscape. But not many who visit, according to Tony, realize the deeper history here. Thank you for being so generous with your time to share it with us. #navajonation #monumentvalley | © instagram.com/natgeo
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@marcusbleasdale I am posting archive images taken for @humanrightswatch and @natgeo in Central African… read more
@marcusbleasdale I am posting archive images taken for @humanrightswatch and @natgeo in Central African Republic over the past four years, to highlight to ongoing violence in the country. The conflict is continuing and escalating in some areas, this work was shown in the May edition of the magazine and you can see more of it on my Instagram feed over the next few weeks. ⠀This image shows an ex-Seleka rebel standing guard as men and boys dig for gold at a mine near Bambari. The rebels claim a share for “security.” Gold is plentiful in the Central African Republic, but corruption and political instability have kept the profits from benefiting the people. July 2015 | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Video by @pedromcbride // The most sacred river in India, the Ganges, is also often considered the most… read more
Varanasi, India
Video by @pedromcbride // The most sacred river in India, the Ganges, is also often considered the most contaminated because so many ask so much from it - for water, for industry, for agriculture and for religion. It fights industrial and religious pollution yet continues to serve as a sacred lifeline for one billion Hindu as it flows 1500 miles across northern India. To see more, follow @pedromcbride  #chasingrivers #ganges #india #holyunholyriver #nature | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Video by @paulnicklen // I had the pleasure of diving with Vince Pieribone this week on an expedition… read more
Little Cayman
Video by @paulnicklen // I had the pleasure of diving with Vince Pieribone this week on an expedition in the Cayman Islands. Vince (@vpieribone) is the professor of cellular and molecular physiology and neuroscience with Yale University School of Medicine. His research on biofluorescence is both complicated and fascinating. @natgeo reported on these discoveries over a decade ago. Biofluorescent organisms absorb light, transform it, and eject – or “re-emit”–it as a different color. When specialized fluorescent molecules are “excited” by high-energy light (like blue light), they lose a fragment of the light energy and release the rest at a lower-energy wavelength (like green). These fluorescent molecules have been used extensively in biomedical science. In 2008, the Nobel Prize in chemistry was awarded for the discovery of these proteins. Can you believe that we spend exponentially more money on space than we do our oceans? #followme at @paulnicklen to learn more about oceans. With @AluciaProductions and @sea_legacy.  #science #nature #ocean #discovery | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @williamodaniels for @natgeo. In 2016 and early 2017, I travelled to 7 countries in Africa,… read more
Photo by @williamodaniels for @natgeo.In 2016 and early 2017, I travelled to 7 countries in Africa, Asia and Europe to work on the story Why Vaccines Matter published in the current issue of National Geographic Magazine.Here, two children are being registered to be vaccinated in the church of Nzerret, a small village in northern Democratic Republic of Congo, where a measles outbreak erupted in May 2016.MSF (Doctors without borders) response was to start an emergency vaccination campaign during which nearly 40 000 children under 15 have been vaccinated in 8 days in the region around Nzerret. About 800 children were diagnosed with measles and treated by the organization’s medical staff. #vaccineswork #endpolio #childhealth | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @paleyphoto (Matthieu Paley). Unclimbed peaks or a portal into another dimension? Nothing beats… read more
Afghanistan
Photo by @paleyphoto (Matthieu Paley). Unclimbed peaks or a portal into another dimension? Nothing beats losing yourself in mountain wilderness and walking, walking, walking. Back from joining @outofedenwalk expedition through the Pamir. For more mountain images, follow @paleyphoto / On assignment for @natgeo / #roofoftheworld #pamir | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @christian_foto ( Christian Rodriguez ) Guerrero is the number one producer of poppy flower… read more
Photo by @christian_foto ( Christian Rodriguez )Guerrero is the number one producer of poppy flower in Mexico. On a global scale, Guerrero shares the first place with Afghanistan. Mexico provides more than 90 percent of US’s heroin.The poppy flower has become an economic support for many families in the "Sierra de Guerrero" ( Guerrero mountain chain), since it is much more profitable than any other crop. Due to the high poverty rates, many peasants prefer to grow the poppy flower in order to cover their basic needs.There is a direct link between violence in Mexico and the records of heroin use in the United States. During the last decade, heroin use in the United States has increased fivefold and addiction has tripled.Photo by @christian_foto #Guerrero #poppy #heroin #mexico | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @noralorek for @natgeo. Grace Monia is 13 years old and lives with her foster mum Rona in Bidibidi… read more
Bidibidi Refugee Settlement, Northern Uganda
Photo by @noralorek for @natgeo. Grace Monia is 13 years old and lives with her foster mum Rona in Bidibidi refugee settlement in Uganda. She got lost from her parents when running for their life during shootings in their village in South Sudan. Until now nobody has seen or heard from her parents and Rona believes they were killed that night. Many children are getting lost from their parents when trying to get from South Sudan to Uganda at night. At the same time many mothers who already have more than five kids chose to open up their home for those who have nobody left..In August the one millionth refugee from South Sudan entered Uganda in escape of the war. With most of the refugees being women and children and leaving during shootings at night their bedsheets called Milaya are often one of the few things they carry with them. The handmade patterns have been made in South Sudan and Sudan for generations and the tradition of the Milayas continues in what has become their temporary home while waiting for the war to end. Bidibidi is with its more than 270 000 people considered one of the worlds largest refugee settlements.For more pictures from 'The Milaya Studios' follow @noralorek | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @mmuheisen (Muhammed Muheisen) Saleem, a 12-year-old refugee from Afghanistan, rests on a bunk… read more
Photo by @mmuheisen (Muhammed Muheisen) Saleem, a 12-year-old refugee from Afghanistan, rests on a bunk bed at a "one stop center" where he and other refugees have taken refuge near the Croatian border in Serbia. One stop centers offer food, medical support and assistance with documentation for refugees. For more photos of the refugee crisis follow @mmuheisen and @everydayrefugees #everydayrefugees #muhammedmuheisen | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Video by @bertiegregory. A pair of bottlenose dolphins glide majestically through late afternoon sunrays.… read more
Video by @bertiegregory. A pair of bottlenose dolphins glide majestically through late afternoon sunrays. Dolphins have a great way of teasing you. They’ll buzz in out of nowhere, get you all excited, and then before you’re actually ready to photograph them, they’ll whizz off again into the blue. This encounter however, was one where they kindly and calmly cooperated! Predators like these dolphins are crucial to the functionality of coral reefs as they keep the number of grazing animals in check. When you look after the predators, you look after everything underneath! Follow @bertiegregory for more wildlife adventures! | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photograph by @paulnicklen // The locals call him Niño, which in Spanish means “boy.” He is only eight… read more
Cuba
Photograph by @paulnicklen // The locals call him Niño, which in Spanish means “boy.” He is only eight or nine feet long but that does not mean he lacks confidence. If I got too close he would gently remind me to back off by slowly opening up his mouth. He is definitely not as scary as he looks.  #follow me on @paulnicklen to see a much larger croc follow me at night in the mangroves of Cuba.  #gratitude  #nature #cuba #TurningTheTide with @sea_legacy #adventure #explore #instagood #smile #picoftheday #instagood #instadaily | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @FransLanting Tension is palpable when these female impalas bend down to drink at a water hole… read more
Botswana
Photo by @FransLanting  Tension is palpable when these female impalas bend down to drink at a water hole in Northern Botswana; their perked ears show they’re ready to bolt at the slightest sign of danger. This image is featured in our new book “Into Africa,” which is based on the @NatGeo exhibition by the same name. To learn more, follow me @FransLanting.@natgeotravel  @thephotosociety  @natgeocreative  #Africa  #Impala  #Botswana  #Okavango  #Wildlife  #Nature  #Beauty | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @shonephoto (Robbie Shone) - Deep underground inside a cave called Imawari Yueta on top of Auyán… read more
Photo by @shonephoto (Robbie Shone) - Deep underground inside a cave called Imawari Yueta on top of Auyán Tepui, Venezuela, we emerge at the base of a giant skylight, where sunlight pours down through a huge waterfall. The walls are covered in green moss and algae. It reminds me that another world exists outside. As one explorer passes behind the waterfall, her shadow is projected so much bigger than herself onto the waterfall. This photograph is from a portfolio I made from inside caves on top of extremely remote tepuis (aka table-top mountains) in Venezuela. The scientists we were traveling with were looking for unique forms of bacteria that could help clinical microbiologists in studies into bacterial resistance to antibiotics. It was a fascinating assignment to a very remote and rarely visited part of our world. The diverse environment on top of these tepuis is like no other anywhere on planet Earth, as each tepui is different and home to a unique world. @natgeocreative | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Saudi women take scuba diving classes off the coast of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. More than a year after “The… read more
Saudi women take scuba diving classes off the coast of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. More than a year after “The a changing a face of Saudi Women” was published in National Geographic Magazine, Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has recently said he will return the Kingdom to a more moderate Islam, and is opening up the country to business. Photograph by Lynsey Addario for National Geographic Magazine. @lynseyaddario #Saudiwomen #saudiarabia #lynseyaddario | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photograph by Michael Yamashita @yamashitaphoto - In the fishing village of Kokilameda, houses are painted… read more
Mahapalipuram, Tamil Nadu, India
Photograph by Michael Yamashita @yamashitaphoto - In the fishing village of Kokilameda, houses are painted in the colors of the rainbow. The white geometric design in front of the house is a Hindu tradition called Kolam. Family members draw the lines using rice flour with a new design done daily.The practice is thought to bring prosperity to the household and  is a sign of welcome to visitors. Following the Maritime Silk Road in South India for the next 2 weeks traveling the coast line from Chennai to Kochi. @thesilkroadjourney #followme #silkroadindia2017 #mahabalipuram #india #kolam #tamilnadu @natgeocreative @natgeo @natgeo.media | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo: @andy_mann // A pod of Sperm Whales effortlessly disappear into the blue just as quickly as they… read more
Ponta Delgada, Azores
Photo: @andy_mann // A pod of Sperm Whales effortlessly disappear into the blue just as quickly as they arrived. For centuries the Azores archipelago was a major whaling ground in the North Atlantic where an estimated 25,000 whales were captured. The activities ended in 1984 and their consumptive mentality turned steadily into a conservationist perspective. Now, those who once harvested whales work as whale spotters for the tourism industry, bringing thousands of tourists and a new economy to the islands. Roughly 700 Sperm Whales visit the islands every year. // #TurningTheTide @sea_legacy //#followme @andy_mann to see a video of this pod of whales socializing in a vertical position only a few feet from my camera: my most precious ocean experience. | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo @michaelchristopherbrown. Dancers take care to ensure regalia is intact while inside the pow wow… read more
Pine Ridge Indian Reservation
Photo @michaelchristopherbrown. Dancers take care to ensure regalia is intact while inside the pow wow dance arena. If one of them drops an eagle feather (visible at upper left), considered by many tribes to be a connection to the Creator, all dancing stops until the feather is properly retrieved. Atop the various designs, all unique to each dancer and dance, there may also be added various items like tobacco tin lids (which add shine and make a tinker sound), porcupine quills and traditional beadwork reflecting heritage. I was surprised to learn the modern pow wow dance and associated competition, evolved from the Grass Dance, has only been around since the late 1800’s, begun during Buffalo Bill’s Wild West shows. I spent hours watching these dances and loved listening to the drum groups scattered around the arena, representing various tribes in attendance. | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @williamalbertallard // In the fall of 1967 I was up on the mountainside of the French Basque… read more
Basque Country
Photo by @williamalbertallard // In the fall of 1967 I was up on the mountainside of the French Basque country photographing a farmer and his wife working with a pair of mules, cutting, raking and stacking hay. The woman has a lean and strong looking body, tanned by much exposure to the elements.  She worked every bit as hard as her husband to make a go of their rural life with all of their work in those years still done with animals, not tractors. The face of the mule in the foreground kind of draws us in to the center of the picture dominated by the farmer, another mule, and his wife.  I’ve always regretted making the bottom of the frame so abrupt.  I should have allowed more space at the bottom. My photo essay was called “In the Land of the Ancient Basques,” in the August, 1968 issue.#followme @williamalbertallard for more images of the Basque Country and other assignments spanning five decades. #basque #basquecountry #farmlife #farming #hay #mules #mulesofinstagram #filmphotography #williamalbertallard | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Image by @joelsartore | Northern sea otters like this one named Capers at the @MNZoo are found from Russia,… read more
Image by @joelsartore | Northern sea otters like this one named Capers at the @MNZoo are found from Russia, along the coast all the way to Baja and are a larger species than the ones found along the CA coast. Males can weigh as much as 100 pounds while females are smaller at around 50-60 pounds.  Sea otters are among the most charismatic marine mammals and are often found carrying rocks for use in opening their prey. They find food under rocks on the bottom of the ocean floor and along the shoreline where they forage on mussels, clams, crabs and urchins. Sea otter fur is the densest of any marine mammal and has as many as one million hairs per square inch. Because they have no blubber, otters are constantly grooming themselves to keep themselves warm in the cold oceans they inhabit. Otters paws have claws that turn backward and they use them as a “comb” to keep the hairs separated, blowing air into their coats to enhance the warmth. While oil spills are harmful to all sea life, the sea otter is especially vulnerable because they are dependent on a pristine coat for their warmth. As a keystone species, otters keep the environment in balance. They are often the dominant species that keeps lesser species from taking over. They are also an indicator of the health of the oceans they inhabit. If the otters are not surviving on the food they consume, then neither will the humans who eat the same type of food.Populations of sea otters are declining in some areas while other areas are stable at the moment, but due to human impact they live on a precipice of extinction. Today the southern sea otter as well as some populations of the Northern sea otter, is listed as a “threatened population” and it is up to us to take the necessary steps to protect the environment in which they live in order to protect the environment for all of us.This image was taken with a Nikon D4. To see another image of this otter, check out @joelsartore!..#otters #NOTAPET #cute #seaotters #adorable #otter #cuteanimals #sealife #marinelife #marinemammals #nature #conservation #biodiversity #animalfacts #wildlife #wildlifephotography #natgeo #savetogether #photoark | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photograph by @simonnorfolkstudio Crossrail is a 118-km (73-mile) railway line under development in… read more
Farringdon station
Photograph by @simonnorfolkstudioCrossrail is a 118-km (73-mile) railway line under development in and around London. Here Tunnel Boring Machine 'Victoria,' named after Queen Victoria who oversaw the birth of modern railways, breaking through into the eastern end of Liverpool Street Crossrail station. The breakthrough, 40m beneath the City of London, is part of Crossrail’s longest tunnel drive, 8.3km from Limmo Peninsula, near Canning Town, to Farringdon. On completion of Crossrail tunnelling, a total of 42km of rail tunnel will have been bored as part of Europe’s largest infrastructure project.Follow @simonnorfolkstudio for updates, outtakes, unpublished and archive material.#documentaryphotography #simonnorfolk #crossrail #museumoflondon #tunnelling #construction #photooftheday #seetheworld @simonorfolkstudio #museumoflondondocklands #London #underlondon #archaeology @museumoflondon | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @jimmy_chin It’s always a fun romp through the mountains w @alexhonnold and co. Alex on the… read more
Photo by @jimmy_chin It’s always a fun romp through the mountains w @alexhonnold and co. Alex on the top of South Howser Tower contemplating the descent. Always good to remember the summit is only half way.... | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by: @renaeffendiphoto In Maramures, Romania, cooking up plum jam in the autumn is usually a man's… read more
Photo by: @renaeffendiphoto In Maramures, Romania, cooking up plum jam in the autumn is usually a man's job. It takes eight to ten hours of uninterrupted stirring to make sure the jam on the bottom of the pot doesn’t burn. The jam is thought to be the best remedy against the winter flue season. This grandfather from Sârbi village wears the traditional small Maramureş hat. For more human interest stories follow me at: @renaeffendiphoto #traditional #culture #romania #maramures #transylvania #winter #food @thephotosociety @natgeocreative | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @paleyphoto (Matthieu Paley). Do you feel your city council is doing its best to give you easy… read more
Boulder, Colorado
Photo by @paleyphoto (Matthieu Paley). Do you feel your city council is doing its best to give you easy access to green spaces? More than a hundred cyclists arrive at a city park in #Boulder (Colorado, USA) for the weekly Happy Thursday Cruiser Ride. ?? The theme for this evening’s ride around town was “Hawaiian shirt.” Participants are encouraged “to cruise and not to race” and “to ride in control and not be a troll.” Part of a story on Happiness for @natgeo , just out. Easy access to the outdoor is proven to reduce stress, increasing happiness. More on @paleyphoto #cruisecontrol #happycyclist | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @andreabruce When I started working on the issue of open defecation in India, people living… read more
Photo by @andreabruceWhen I started working on the issue of open defecation in India, people living there told me I had to photograph the railroad tracks. Every morning, people who don’t have access to toilets desperately search for a somewhat private place to go near the tracks in places like this in the Anna Nagar slum. The Indian government is attempting to provide every Indian with a toilet by 2019. Open defecation leads to a high level of child mortality throughout the world. Shot for the August issue of National Geographic, “A Place to Go."#india #sanitation @noorimages | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Video @Ladzinski / A parallaxing time-lapse of #Yellowstone’s #grottoGeyser erupting under a veil of… read more
Yellowstone National Park
Video @Ladzinski / A parallaxing time-lapse of #Yellowstone’s #grottoGeyser erupting under a veil of stars in the early hours of the night. This geyser generally erupts every 8 hours, but times can vary slightly. Seeing it erupt at night makes you feel like your on another planet. My camera was completely drenched in the making of this clip but totally worth it! #YellowstonePledge @yellowstonenps | © instagram.com/natgeo
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Photo by @amivitale. Mara, a reticulated giraffe, greets keeper Lekupania, at @sararacamp, a conservancy… read more
Photo by @amivitale. Mara, a reticulated giraffe, greets keeper  Lekupania, at @sararacamp, a conservancy that cares for orphan giraffe, zebra, Kudu, Gerunuk, warthogs, and waterbuck. Mara, an adult, has actually already been successfully released into the wild, but each time a new rescue giraffe comes to Sarara, the three giraffe who have been successfully re-wilded return to the sanctuary to welcome the newcomer.They must have some way of communicating and knowing these babies are there? Current estimates are that giraffe populations across Africa have dropped 40 percent, plummeting from 140,000 in the late 1990s to around 85,000 today. Read my story on giraffe in @Natgeo and follow @amivitale to learn more. #DontLetThemDisappear @nrt_kenya @conservationorg @tusk_org @kenyawildlifeservice @sandiegozoo @natgeo @natgeocreative @thephotosociety #savegiraffes #stoppoaching #kenya #northernkenya #magicalkenya #whyilovekenya #africa #everydayafrica #photojournalism #amivitale @giraffe_conservation | © instagram.com/natgeo
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@cristinamittermeier in the Gardens of the Queen // I vaguely heard cameraman @Andy_Mann slip into the… read more
Jardines de la Reina
@cristinamittermeier in the Gardens of the Queen // I vaguely heard cameraman @Andy_Mann slip into the water behind me to film me as several Silky sharks emerged from the darkening waters and started circling around us.  As the sun set on the horizon, the inky darkness clung to everything, making it harder to see underwater. The sharks were not interested in us as food, but they were undeniably curious.  Over time, they have learned to associate small boats with fish scraps, as fishermen often toss the remains of their catch in the water.  Around and around they went, sometimes bumping into us but never with any aggression.  I can say that for both Andy and I, this was a life-changing experience and a highlight from our recent expedition to the majestic Gardens of the Queen.To see the photograph I took of Silky sharks at the surface at sunset, follow my #instagram feed at @CristinaMittermeier.Video by @andy_mann. #TurningTheTide, with @sea_legacy and @paulnicklen | @aluciaproductions | @samkretch | @Mdalio | #gardensofthequeen | #Cuba | #JardinesdelaReina | @iankellet_story | #savesharks | #TheOceanFoundation | #aluciaproductions | #daliooceansinitiative | #marineconservation #tiburon #tubarao | © instagram.com/natgeo