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Milford and Judy Killion were on vacation in Georgia when Harvey hit Spring, Texas. “When we left, it… read more
Milford and Judy Killion were on vacation in Georgia when Harvey hit Spring, Texas. “When we left, it was just a tropical depression that they talked about going into upper Mexico or the valley area,” Judy says. “It didn’t do that.” The Killion’s returned to find their home of 44 years flooded for the first time. “I understand that things that are personal are things you want to save,” Milford said. “But I’m healthy. She’s healthy. I feel like if the house fell in, I might shed a tear or two, but I’m not going to let it kill me.” Judy says, “I’m very emotional about it. I’ve cried over everything I pick up.” (Credit: @mitohabeevans and @nicktmichael | Mito Habe-Evans and Nick Michael/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Flooding from Hurricane Harvey forced Basem Al-Salim, 39, his daughter Hanin, 5, and the rest of their… read more
Flooding from Hurricane Harvey forced Basem Al-Salim, 39, his daughter Hanin, 5, and the rest of their family to seek shelter at the Islamic Society of Greater Houston. Fleeing the war in Syria, their family had settled in Houston less than a year before Harvey hit. “We fled from the problems of war, and we found the problems of drowning! That’s the problem that happened! We regressed to the very same emotions we had in Syria, during the crisis of war,” says al-Salim. “We felt like refugees again.” Al-Salim says he was told they’d be able to return to their home soon, where he hopes life will return to normal. When asked about his ability to maintain a smile through the hardship of displacement, he said, “If we keep just thinking about our problems we will die. It’s better at least to smile about it.” (Credit: @mitohabeevans and @nicktmichael | Mito Habe-Evans and Nick Michael/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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"To be honest I’m a little panicked right now. I actually recently got married … and I’ve bought a house,… read more
"To be honest I’m a little panicked right now. I actually recently got married … and I’ve bought a house, and I’m trying to pay it off,” says David Olaiz, 24, who has been in the U.S. since he was 7 and is currently protected by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program or DACA. He poses for a video portrait with his wife Anisa Olaiz during the Defend DACA! march in Houston, Texas, on Tuesday.The possible end of DACA is forcing Olaiz to ask himself questions he wasn’t prepared for. “Is it even worth it to pay off my house at this point? Is my credit score even of value anymore to me?” he wonders. “A lot of things that I’ve worked so hard to acquire, and at this point I’m like ‘Was it even worth it? Should I be getting ready to be deported?’ … I’m not even sure how to get ready for these things, to be honest.” Follow the link in our bio to see the full video. (Credit: @mitohabeevans and @nicktmichael | Mito Habe-Evans and Nick Michael/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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"I have lived here since I was 6 years old, so my whole life,” said Wendy Ramos at the Defend DACA! march… read more
"I have lived here since I was 6 years old, so my whole life,” said Wendy Ramos at the Defend DACA! march in Houston on Tuesday. “I do not have any memories of El Salvador, which is where I’m from. This is the only place I know as home.” Ramos, who is now 24, was 18 when she first learned she might be eligible for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. “DACA just opened many doors for everybody to contribute to society—For all of us to come out of the shadows and make a difference. And we do.” Follow the link in our bio to see the full video. (Credit: @mitohabeevans and @nicktmichael | Mito Habe-Evans and Nick Michael/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Baylee Jackson (left) and Kyle Proctor, evacuated from Corpus Christi on Aug. 25, as Hurricane Harvey… read more
Inks Lake State Park
Baylee Jackson (left) and Kyle Proctor, evacuated from Corpus Christi on Aug. 25, as Hurricane Harvey was making landfall on the Texas coast. The couple, who are expecting their first child on Sept. 20, say that the people at Inks Lake State Park in Burnet, Texas have been very helpful. Volunteers have brought baby clothes and have helped the couple find a doctor for Baylee.⠀⠀Roughly 7,500 people have sought shelter at Texas State Parks since the state parks opened to evacuees on Aug. 24, before Hurricane Harvey made landfall, according to Stephanie Garcia, a representative with Texas Parks & Wildlife. Follow the link in our bio to see more photos and the full story. (Credit: @katiehayesluke | Katie Hayes Luke) | © instagram.com/npr
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Fruit concentrate is often a mystery ingredient that pops up in a lot of household favorites, but its… read more
Fruit concentrate is often a mystery ingredient that pops up in a lot of household favorites, but its nutrition level depends on how it's used. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @feever_dreem | Joy Ho for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Bret Hinkie, a Houston-area commercial airline pilot, is driving boats for people in need. He gets calls… read more
Bret Hinkie, a Houston-area commercial airline pilot, is driving boats for people in need. He gets calls from people all over Houston who want to be taken to their homes and then picked up after gathering their belongings.⠀⠀"What caught me by surprise was that I was bringing people to their homes for the first time," Hinkie said. "They finally see what they had known, but had not yet seen it with their own eyes. It really caught them by surprise emotionally ... That caught me off guard." Follow the link in our bio for more photos and to see the full story. (Credit: @scott.a.dalton | Scott Dalton for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Jennifer McKnight was flooded out in New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina. Her Houston home was still… read more
Jennifer McKnight was flooded out in New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina. Her Houston home was still filled with about 2 to 3 feet of water on Thursday.⠀⠀Flooding from Hurricane Harvey has been widespread across Houston, Texas, and surrounding areas. While the storm has dissipated, water remains in many homes. People are starting to return to the Nottingham Forest subdivision, an upscale area located just north of Buffalo Bayou, which has been heavily flooded. ⠀⠀Families are going back into the area to check on their homes, trying to salvage as much as possible. People are in kayaks and boats, but the water currents could be strong, almost to the point of needing a motor boat to navigate. Follow the link in our bio to see more photos and the full story. (Credit: @scott.a.dalton | Scott Dalton for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Joseph Quarterman (left), Bob Martin, Howard Gasaway, and Chubby Martin wear their captain's uniforms… read more
Joseph Quarterman (left), Bob Martin, Howard Gasaway, and Chubby Martin wear their captain's uniforms as they prepare for the annual flag raising ceremony at the Seafarers Yacht Club in Washington D.C., in June, 2016.⠀⠀Born out of necessity during segregation, this club is one of the country's oldest black boating clubs. Over 70 years after its founding, the members must decide how to move forward. Follow the link in our bio to see more photos. (Credit: @beckharlan) | © instagram.com/npr
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Money can't buy happiness, right? Well, some researchers beg to differ. They say it depends on how you… read more
Money can't buy happiness, right? Well, some researchers beg to differ. They say it depends on how you spend it. A recent study suggests that when people spend their extra cash to get help with time-consuming chores, they're likelier to feel better than if they use the money to buy more things. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @kristensolecki | Kristen Solecki for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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If a blood-thinner has helped someone in your family, you may have a cow to thank. In the 1930s a farmer… read more
If a blood-thinner has helped someone in your family, you may have a cow to thank. In the 1930s a farmer in Wisconsin noticed his cows were getting sick from eating spoiled sweet clover hay. They were bleeding to death internally, and no one knew why. He took a can of cows blood to Karl Paul Link, a scientist at the University of Wisconsin. Link discovered that there’s a substance in the hay called coumarin that turns into a powerful blood thinner. They developed a potent version of it that soon became a popular rat poison. But the scientists kept thinking about its potential in preventing blood clots in humans. So they tested it in patients, and it worked! The potent version became known as Warfarin, a mashup of WARF, the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, and coumarin. Follow the link in our bio to see the full story. (Credit: Avi Ofer for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Adbelhamid Moursy is a telecom engineer and education director at Al-Salam mosque in Houston. "We will… read more
Adbelhamid Moursy is a telecom engineer and education director at Al-Salam mosque in Houston. "We will take any family ... any person," Moursy says. A day after the Hurricane Harvey hit Houston, the mosque welcomed people displaced by flooding. Check out our Story for more photos. (Credit: @rjckseen | Ryan Kellman/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Teniya Brewer walks through Pauline Simpson's home looking at the water damage in her home in the Kashmere… read more
Teniya Brewer walks through Pauline Simpson's home looking at the water damage in her home in the Kashmere Gardens neighborhood of Houston on Wednesday. Simpson’s family hid in the attic during the storm to escape the flood waters.⠀⠀Poor neighborhoods on the northeast side of Houston were hit hard by the flooding from Hurricane Harvey. But residents say they received little help evacuating, and now they are struggling to get basics: food, water and information. Follow the link in our bio to see more photos and the full story. (Credit: @claireeclaire | Claire Harbage/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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For writer Jesmyn Ward, Mississippi is a place she loves and hates all at once. The author's books are… read more
For writer Jesmyn Ward, Mississippi is a place she loves and hates all at once. The author's books are set in the poor, black Mississippi community where she grew up, a place where, she says, "the past bears very heavily on the present." Those struggles, hinging on race and class, run all through her writing, including her novel, 'Salvage the Bones,' which won Ward a National Book Award in 2011 to her latest novel, 'Sing, Unburied, Sing.' Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @ek_the_pj | Emily Kask for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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The Gulf Coast of Texas has seen record rainfall as a result of Tropical Storm Harvey, which made landfall… read more
The Gulf Coast of Texas has seen record rainfall as a result of Tropical Storm Harvey, which made landfall as a Category 4 hurricane late Friday. By the time the storm moves out, some parts of the region may see up to 50 inches of rain. This graphic shows the total precipitation that has fallen in the area since 8 a.m. ET on Friday. Follow the link in our bio for ongoing storm coverage. (Credit: Alyson Hurt/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Rescuers in Houston got a family out safely, but one member was missing. So they went back. Follow the… read more
Rescuers in Houston got a family out safely, but one member was missing. So they went back. Follow the link in our bio for ongoing storm coverage. (Credit: @nprgreene | David Greene/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Joseph Guilroy got to Houston's George R. Brown Convention Center via a city dump truck which took him… read more
Joseph Guilroy got to Houston's George R. Brown Convention Center via a city dump truck which took him to a transit center and then he got on a bus. ⠀⠀"My apartment is done. It's been hell. This is my city, I been here all my life. We are gonna get through it though. We always do." Check out our Story for more photos from the convention center. (Credit: @rjckseen | Ryan Kellman/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Mel Mikan pushes his wife, Barbara, toward a DoubleTree hotel in downtown Houston on Monday. They had… read more
Mel Mikan pushes his wife, Barbara, toward a DoubleTree hotel in downtown Houston on Monday. They had been evacuated to the Coliseum arena. "We had knee-deep water in our house, so we're here," says Mel Mikan, who was rescued with his wife, Barbara, Sunday night by a Bellaire Fire Department boat. ⠀⠀The historic Houston flood of 2017 is deepening, and with it, there are more water rescues — at least 2,000 by Monday afternoon. People who believed that they could wait it out or that the water would go down are realizing they have to get out. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @katiehayesluke | Katie Hayes Luke for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Researchers have found that people with deep friendships in adolescence had less anxiety and a greater… read more
Researchers have found that people with deep friendships in adolescence had less anxiety and a greater sense of self-worth in early adulthood. Close friends matter, their study found. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @studioria | Maria Fabrizio for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Houston residents Julian Fernandez (left) and Simon Loscertales survey the flooding next to Buffalo Bayou… read more
Houston residents Julian Fernandez (left) and Simon Loscertales survey the flooding next to Buffalo Bayou Park in Houston. "I am now a refugee," says Fernandez, whose neighborhood has flooded. Follow the link in our bio for ongoing coverage. (Credit: @katiehayesluke | Katie Hayes Luke for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Hurricane Harvey destroyed a five-story boat storage facility in Rockport, Texas. Follow the link in… read more
Hurricane Harvey destroyed a five-story boat storage facility in Rockport, Texas. Follow the link in our bio for our ongoing storm coverage. (Credit: @thatrussell | Russell Lewis/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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The remnants of now-Tropical Storm Harvey have all but parked over south Texas and the storm is inundating… read more
The remnants of now-Tropical Storm Harvey have all but parked over south Texas and the storm is inundating the region around Houston with "unprecedented" rain, according to the National Weather Service.⠀⠀Houstonians have been stranded in their homes, and some of those who were on the roads were in need of rescue as areas of Houston received as much as two feet of rain with no immediate end in sight. Follow the link in our bio to see more photos and the full story. (Credit: @katiehayesluke |Katie Hayes Luke for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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It was 15 years ago that Maine began the first, and still the only, statewide school laptop program.… read more
It was 15 years ago that Maine began the first, and still the only, statewide school laptop program. Experts worry that an attempt to bridge the digital divide might have widened it. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @ericdiotte | Eric Diotte for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Mary Abagi is a 63-year-old widow who has spent most of her life eking out a living by growing crops… read more
Mary Abagi is a 63-year-old widow who has spent most of her life eking out a living by growing crops on a tiny plot of land in her Kenyan village. Then, last fall, Abagi learned that the village had been picked for an unusual experiment that promised to change her life.⠀⠀An American charity called GiveDirectly is giving every adult in the village $22 every month for the next 12 years. Abagi's first thought: "I will save the money to buy a goat." And to do that, Abagi has turned to a special kind of savings club the villagers call a "merry-go-round."⠀⠀Abagi's club has 10 members — almost all older women like her. Every month, almost as soon as they get their payment from GiveDirectly, the members meet to put $10 each into a pot. Each month, a different member takes home the pot — $100. That is why they call it a merry-go-round. Follow the link in our bio to see more photos and the full story. (Credit: @nicholesobecki | Nichole Sobecki for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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A group of people look out from a hillside in eastern Oregon, near Baker City, to watch the eclipse on… read more
A group of people look out from a hillside in eastern Oregon, near Baker City, to watch the eclipse on Monday morning. A total solar eclipse makes its way from Oregon to South Carolina today. Fourteen states are in the path of total darkness. Follow the link in our bio for live coverage. (Credit: @idontwrite | Rajah Bose/OPB) #eclipse | © instagram.com/npr
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A growing number of food videos aim to trigger ASMR — Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response, or pleasing… read more
A growing number of food videos aim to trigger ASMR — Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response, or pleasing sensations in the brains of some viewers — by focusing on sounds like chopping and stirring. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @xxtinalee | Christina Lee for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Teachers of ethnic studies argue that these courses give students a pathway to break the cycles of poverty,… read more
Teachers of ethnic studies argue that these courses give students a pathway to break the cycles of poverty, violence, and incarceration that so many communities of color face.⠀⠀"Ethnic studies works," says Artnelson Concordia, a veteran teacher who is helping to develop the San Francisco curriculum. He wants students to see that "all of their experiences can be connected to larger issues."⠀⠀"So by the end of the school year, they're seeing themselves as makers of history," Concordia says. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: LA Johnson/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Skunk Bear's latest video explores the history of eclipse science, from the earliest astronomers who… read more
Skunk Bear's latest video explores the history of eclipse science, from the earliest astronomers who began to take the measurements of the solar system, to the great thinkers who saw their wildest theories proven, to the modern scientists who still rely on eclipses to probe the sun's secrets. Follow the link in our bio for the full video. (Credit: @rjckseen and @cadamole | Ryan Kellman and Adam Cole/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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When Nicole O’Hara was diagnosed with breast cancer at 29, she had a double mastectomy. The surgery,… read more
When Nicole O’Hara was diagnosed with breast cancer at 29, she had a double mastectomy. The surgery, reconstruction and chemotherapy that followed left her with inflamed scarring across her chest. "To be reminded of those [scars] every time you look in the mirror can be hard," she says. "You're trying to move past that point in your life.” So O’Hara decided to change the meaning behind her scars with something more symbolic — a tattoo with special meaning. Follow the link in our bio to see the full video. (Credit: @mererizzo and @morgmccloy | Meredith Rizzo and Morgan McCloy/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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In NPR's new international podcast, Rough Translation, host and longtime foreign correspondent Gregory… read more
In NPR's new international podcast, Rough Translation, host and longtime foreign correspondent Gregory Warner travels the globe to drop in on stories that reflect back on subjects we're talking about in the U.S. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @cornelia_illo | Cornelia Li for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Dancan Odero, 30, is the resident of a village in Kenya where every adult is getting $22 a month, every… read more
Dancan Odero, 30, is the resident of a village in Kenya where every adult is getting $22 a month, every month, for the next 12 years as part of a grand experiment. It’s a big help — he has seizures that make it nearly impossible for him to work. In the past, he’s had to rely on his mother and siblings to pay for practically everything, including food and medicine. And he's never had enough money to buy furniture or host his friends at his new hut. But now, with the extra income, he can pay for his own meds. And he’s saved enough money to buy something just as precious to him: a sofa and two armchairs. That purchase was so important, he says, “so that when guests came to visit I wouldn’t be ashamed.” When he first got his sofa set, he says, “I couldn’t stop smiling.” Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @nicholesobecki | Nichole Sobecki for NPR) #NoStringsCash | © instagram.com/npr
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This young boy was kidnapped by Boko Haram. He managed to escape, spent months in a government barracks… read more
This young boy was kidnapped by Boko Haram. He managed to escape, spent months in a government barracks and now lives in a rehabilitation center. He is probably around 6 years old but doesn't know for sure and there is no family here to tell us. He has made a new friend at the center — another little boy — but he says he’s still lonely. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: Jide Adeniyi-Jones for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Imagine finding out one day that many of the stories that you told about yourself weren't really true.… read more
Imagine finding out one day that many of the stories that you told about yourself weren't really true. The way you understood your family history, the way you explained your personality ("I'm Italian, of course I talk loud!"), the way you talked about your hair — what if all of it was just, well, stories?⠀⠀Or maybe even stranger: What if you found out that you had a whole hidden history that you'd never known about? That generations of your family had lived through events that you had no idea you were connected to?⠀⠀Would that change who you are?⠀⠀Follow the link in our bio to hear the latest episode of the NPR Code Switch podcast. (Credit: @christina.illustrates | Christina Chung for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Chance the Rapper, hip-hop's unsigned overachiever, speaks with Stretch and Bobbito about SoundCloud,… read more
Chance the Rapper, hip-hop's unsigned overachiever, speaks with Stretch and Bobbito about SoundCloud, how parenting has changed his music and his million-dollar donation to Chicago Public Schools on the latest episode of the What’s Good podcast. Follow the link in our bio to hear the full conversation. (Credit: @phil_to_tha_e | Philippe Callant for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Andrea “Teacup” Towson was known in West Baltimore as the go-to person for help getting high. Last year,… read more
Andrea “Teacup” Towson was known in West Baltimore as the go-to person for help getting high. Last year, she nearly died from a fentanyl overdose.⠀⠀For many months, we didn't know what happened to Teacup. But then this summer, we got word that she had eventually made it into treatment and had just celebrated eight months of recovery.⠀⠀ "Thank God for another day," she says. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @shelbsknowles | Shelby Knowles/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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If vegetables are the monarchs of nutritious eating, fruits have always been part of the royal court… read more
If vegetables are the monarchs of nutritious eating, fruits have always been part of the royal court — not quite as important, but still worthy of respect. But now that nutrition guidelines are cracking down on sugar, some people are questioning fruits' estimable role in a healthy diet. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @feever_dream | Joy Ho for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Kareem Abdul Jabbar is taking his shot helping narrow the opportunity and equity gaps with his Skyhook… read more
Kareem Abdul Jabbar is taking his shot helping narrow the opportunity and equity gaps with his Skyhook Foundation and Camp Skyhook. The Los Angeles nonprofit helps public school students in the city access a free, fun, week-long STEM education camp experience in the Angeles National Forest. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: LA Johnson/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Lobstering has traditionally been considered a man's job. But Maine's lobster fleet has a growing number… read more
Lobstering has traditionally been considered a man's job. But Maine's lobster fleet has a growing number of women, like Sadie Samuels, running their own boats, and busting stereotypes along the way. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: Murray Carpenter for NPR) #Maine #Lobsters | © instagram.com/npr
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Girls are much less likely to be diagnosed with autism, but that may be because the signs of the disorder… read more
Girls are much less likely to be diagnosed with autism, but that may be because the signs of the disorder are different than in boys. And girls may be missing out on help as a result. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @saraarielwong | Sara Wong for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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After the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, nongovernment organizations dumped hundreds of thousands of gallons… read more
After the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, nongovernment organizations dumped hundreds of thousands of gallons of raw sewage at the end of the Port-au-Prince city landfill, which borders the sea and is not lined with an impermeable material.⠀⠀At its core, the floundering sewage treatment strategy is about money and power. Haitian economist Kesner Pharel, who has advised on investment and development in the country, says the stalled plan reflects a fundamental flaw with how infrastructure projects are funded and implemented in Haiti.⠀⠀Because the Haitian government is so dependent on outside money for infrastructure, "it is very easy for [international donors] to come in and say, 'I'm going to do this, I'm going to do that,' " he explains. The result is that the country's leaders become more responsive to funders than to Haitian voters. "Where is the accountability?" he says, "not to international donors, but to your people?"⠀⠀Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @mariearago | Marie Arago for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Data from nearly 43,000 men around the world found that sperm counts dropped by more than half in Western… read more
Data from nearly 43,000 men around the world found that sperm counts dropped by more than half in Western countries. It could reflect a decline in health overall, scientists say. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @hannabarczyk | Hanna Barczyk for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Joaquin "Jocko" Fajardo makes a spicy Mexican version of chop suey, a classic Chinese-American dish.… read more
Joaquin "Jocko" Fajardo makes a spicy Mexican version of chop suey, a classic Chinese-American dish. He tells us how his great-aunt learned to make the dish from the Asian employees at her Mexican restaurant in Los Angeles. Feeling inspired? Share your own Hot Pot story by posting a food memory on Instagram, using the hashtag #NPRHotPot. (Credit: NPR) #MexicanFood #ChineseFood #chopsuey #InternationalCuisine | © instagram.com/npr
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Movies are full of talkative chimps and gorillas, but could nonhuman apes really use language? NPR's… read more
Movies are full of talkative chimps and gorillas, but could nonhuman apes really use language? NPR's Skunk Bear sorts through the disturbing history of research on ape language to sort fact from wishful thinking. Follow the link in our bio to watch the full video. (Credit: @rjckseen + @cadamole/ Ryan Kellman + Adam Cole/NPR’s Skunk Bear) | © instagram.com/npr
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"I am overloaded and struggling. It's terrifying."⠀ ⠀ "I feel like I'll be making the last payment from… read more
"I am overloaded and struggling. It's terrifying."⠀⠀"I feel like I'll be making the last payment from my grave."⠀⠀"It is an albatross around my neck. Years of paying and I feel like I'm getting nowhere."⠀⠀Those were some of the comments we received from more than 2,000 respondents to NPR Ed's first Teacher Student Debt survey. Follow the link in our bio to see more results from the survey. (Credit: @Chelseabeck.psd | Chelsea Beck/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Dan Tepfer, a pianist and composer, sees jazz as the pursuit of freedom within a framework — a premise… read more
Dan Tepfer, a pianist and composer, sees jazz as the pursuit of freedom within a framework — a premise that underlies his work with improvisational algorithms and a player piano. Follow the link in our bio to see the full video. (Credit: @JazzNightInAmerica) | © instagram.com/npr
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Construction of the Sherman Avenue Apartments, a Howard University co-project, rises above the courts… read more
Construction of the Sherman Avenue Apartments, a Howard University co-project, rises above the courts of the Banneker Recreation Center in Washington, D.C. Though this development will include some affordable housing, it could also spur further gentrification. ⠀⠀The area around Howard University was once working-class and black. As more nonblack residents move in and property values rise, the D.C. university is taking advantage of the hot real estate market. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @tyronefoto | Tyrone Turner/WAMU) | © instagram.com/npr
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Tymia McCullough, 11, came to Washington recently to lobby Congress over health care to maintain funding… read more
Tymia McCullough, 11, came to Washington recently to lobby Congress over health care to maintain funding for Medicaid. Her family saw it as a life-or-death fight because Tymia has sickle cell anemia.⠀⠀"Without Medicaid, she would not be here," Tymia’s mother Susie Pitts says. "She's had two surgeries, 45 blood transfusions, 49 hospitalizations. Medicaid is what pays it."⠀⠀Check out our Story for more images of Tymia's day on Capitol Hill. (Credit: @liamjamesphoto | Liam James Doyle/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Yasaman Alavi makes zereshk polow, a crunchy-bottomed rice dish popular in her native Iran. Infused with… read more
Yasaman Alavi makes zereshk polow, a crunchy-bottomed rice dish popular in her native Iran. Infused with saffron and spiked with tart barberries, it's traditionally eaten with slow-cooked chicken. Alavi prepares this meal while sharing memories of her aunt's cooking back in Iran, and tells us how she has come to cook Persian cuisine in her new home in Maryland.Feeling inspired? Share your own Hot Pot story by posting a food memory on Instagram, using the hashtag #NPRHotPot. (Credit: NPR) #PersianFood #IranianFood #InternationalCuisine | © instagram.com/npr
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In a wired world, summer camp is one of the last phone-free zones. But campers, staff and especially… read more
In a wired world, summer camp is one of the last phone-free zones. But campers, staff and especially parents don't always appreciate the message. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @suharuogawa | Suharu Ogawa for NPR)⠀ | © instagram.com/npr
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Professional fighter Gina “Danger” Mazany practices during a training session at Xtreme Couture Mixed… read more
Professional fighter Gina “Danger” Mazany practices during a training session at Xtreme Couture Mixed Martial Arts in Las Vegas. She remembers her first concussion well — which came in her first fight. "I was throwing up that night," Mazany says. ⠀⠀Mazany is now helping researchers learn more about head injuries and the female brain. She has volunteered to be part of a study of fighters in Vegas, which includes nearly 700 men and about 60 women. ⠀⠀"Women may be more likely to suffer concussion. Their symptoms may linger longer," Dr. Charles Bernick, the scientist in charge of the study, says. "The question is: Is that because women are just more likely to report injuries, or is there a biological higher vulnerability." Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @bridgetkbennett | Bridget Bennett for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Why make a list of the greatest albums by women? To start a new conversation, where musicians who have… read more
Why make a list of the greatest albums by women? To start a new conversation, where musicians who have too long been marginalized are now at the center. Follow the link in our bio to read the full essay on @NPRMusic. (Credit: @chelseabeck.psd | Chelsea Beck/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Even though President Trump promised to pull the U.S. from the Paris climate accord, former Vice President… read more
Even though President Trump promised to pull the U.S. from the Paris climate accord, former Vice President  Al Gore still sees an "excellent chance" of meeting the accord's commitments to reduce global warming.⠀⠀When it comes to convincing climate change deniers, Al Gore says, "Mother Nature is more persuasive than the scientific community." Follow the link in our bio for the full interview. (Credit: @claireeclaire | Claire Harbage/NPR)⠀ | © instagram.com/npr
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One of a growing trend of interactive art exhibits, "XYZT: Abstract Landscapes" is a collection of 10… read more
ARTECHOUSE
One of a growing trend of interactive art exhibits, "XYZT: Abstract Landscapes" is a collection of 10 digital pieces that mimic nature through projectors, motion sensors and LCD screens. The exhibit is by French artists Adrien M & Claire B and is currently touring the U.S. for the first time. Follow the link in our bio for the full video. (Credit: @moogiem | Maia Stern/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Raising children is a task that requires extensive "on-the-job" training, which is why many women rely… read more
Raising children is a task that requires extensive "on-the-job" training, which is why many women rely on new moms groups for parenting support and guidance. Often, however, as the kids get older, the mothers' friendships fall by the wayside.⠀⠀Now, new research indicates that social support isn't just valuable for mothers of young children, it's beneficial for moms of teens, too. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @okchickadee | Angie Wang for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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This is one of the main passageways to Jerusalem's most contested holy site, what Muslims call the Noble… read more
This is one of the main passageways to Jerusalem's most contested holy site, what Muslims call the Noble Sanctuary and Jews call the Temple Mount. Usually it's full with life but police closed it following a deadly shooting last week. NPR’s Jerusalem correspondent Daniel Estrin saw these Israeli officers on guard there. ⠀⠀“They hid their bright yellow popsicles before I could take the picture,” Estrin says. “Their friend on the left didn’t.” (Credit: @danielestrin22 | Daniel Estrin/NPR)⠀⠀Follow Daniel Estrin to see more news coverage and daily life from this region. | © instagram.com/npr
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Jennifer Ramirez and 14 other young women wearing quinceañera dresses protested on the south steps of… read more
Texas State Capitol
Jennifer Ramirez and 14 other young women wearing quinceañera dresses protested on the south steps of the Texas State Capitol in Austin on Wednesday. They protested Senate Bill 4, an immigration enforcement law. Follow the link in our bio for the full story (Credit: @jsanhuezalyon | Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News) | © instagram.com/npr
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NPR food editor Rhitu Chatterjee is from Kolkata, India. Here she makes khichuri, a fragrant, one-pot… read more
NPR food editor Rhitu Chatterjee is from Kolkata, India. Here she makes khichuri, a fragrant, one-pot rice and lentil dish flavored with red chili, cardamom, buttery ghee and clove that is served with tangy pickled mango. She tells us how her parents made it during monsoon days. The beloved Bengali dish is also popular during religious festivals. Feeling inspired? Share your own Hot Pot story by posting a food memory on Instagram, using the hashtag #NPRHotPot. (Credit: NPR) #IndianFood #BengaliFood #InternationalCuisine | © instagram.com/npr
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Clare Kelley practices "forest bathing" along the edge of an urban forest on Roosevelt Island, in Washington,… read more
Clare Kelley practices "forest bathing" along the edge of an urban forest on Roosevelt Island, in Washington, D.C. In contrast to hiking, forest bathing is less directed, melding mindfulness and nature immersion to improve health. It's a wellness trend, and studies suggest several health benefits. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: Allison Aubrey/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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A recent study shows holding kids back at third grade when they don't meet the academic standards will… read more
A recent study  shows holding kids back at third grade when they don't meet the academic standards will give them a boost in achievement, by some measures. And, it doesn't affect their likelihood of finishing high school. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @chelseabeck.psd | Chelsea Beck/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Public discussion of periods is still a taboo in many parts of the world. But this week in India, everybody's… read more
Public discussion of periods is still a taboo in many parts of the world. But this week in India, everybody's talking about the topic.⠀⠀The reason: an announcement by a Mumbai media firm called Culture Machine: The company has announced that its 75 women employees could take the first day of their period as a paid day off if they experience pain or discomfort. Some reactions have been supportive — and some not. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @hannabarczyk | Hanna Barczyk for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Seeing his potential, one mother wonders why her child isn't held to higher standards at school, despite… read more
Seeing his potential, one mother wonders why her child isn't held to higher standards at school, despite his learning disability. Follow the link in our bio for the full essay. (Credit: @richiepope | Richie Pope for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Chef Dadisi Olutosin makes collard greens, a beloved staple of the American South but with a Caribbean-West… read more
Chef Dadisi Olutosin makes collard greens, a beloved staple of the American South but with a Caribbean-West African twist in the latest episode of NPR’s Hot Pot series. The dish is laced with cardamom, curry and coconut milk, it represents his family's roots.Feeling inspired? Share your own Hot Pot story by posting a food memory on Instagram, using the hashtag #NPRHotPot. (Credit: NPR) #SouthernFood #WestAfricanFood #CaribbeanFood #InternationalCuisine | © instagram.com/npr
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We asked readers to name their favorite comics and graphic novels, and we got thousands of answers. Now,… read more
We asked readers to name their favorite comics and graphic novels, and we got thousands of answers. Now, with the help of our expert panel, we've curated a list to keep you flipping pages all summer. Follow the link in our bio for the full list. (Credit: @shannondrewthis | Shannon Wright for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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On July 15 last year, in an attempted coup, a faction of the Turkish military bombed government buildings,… read more
On July 15 last year, in an attempted coup, a faction of the Turkish military bombed government buildings, blocked roads and bridges and attempted to overthrow President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. The coup attempt was quelled by the next day — but Turkey has been feeling the repercussions ever since.⠀⠀But the primary target of Erdogan's wrath is Fethullah Gulen, an Islamic scholar in his late 70s and has been living in exile in the United States for nearly 20 years. Erdogan blames Gulen for masterminding the failed coup attempt.⠀⠀"If they ask me what my final wish is, I would say the person who caused all this suffering and oppressed thousands of innocents, I want to spit in his face,” Gulen said. Follow the link in our bio for the full interview. (Credit: @bryanthomasphoto | Bryan Thomas for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Maggie Farley, a veteran journalist, says we've had fake news forever and that "people have always been… read more
Maggie Farley, a veteran journalist, says we've had fake news forever and that "people have always been trying to manipulate information for their own ends," but she calls what we're seeing now "Fake news with a capital F." In other words, extreme in its ambition for financial gain or political power.⠀⠀⠀⠀"Before, the biggest concern was, 'Are people being confused by opinion; are people being tricked by spin?'" Now, Farley says, the stakes are much higher. So one day she says an idea came to her: build a game to test users' ability to detect fake news from real. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @chelseabeck.psd | Chelsea Beck/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Treatment for opioid addiction can be expensive and difficult to coordinate. That might make some people… read more
Treatment for opioid addiction can be expensive and difficult to coordinate. That might make some people tempted to think they can overcome the addiction on their own but this rarely works. Follow the link in the bio for the full story. (Credit: @studioria | Maria Fabrizio for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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The minimum wage is flat, college tuition is up and students are broke: Summer jobs just don't have the… read more
The minimum wage is flat, college tuition is up and students are broke: Summer jobs just don't have the purchasing power they used to, especially when you look at the cost of college. Follow the link in the bio for the full story. (Credit: Michelle Kondrich for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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In NPR's Elise Tries video series, correspondent Elise Hu (@elisewho) tries out new experiences in East… read more
In NPR's Elise Tries video series, correspondent Elise Hu (@elisewho) tries out new experiences in East Asia. In Tokyo, she checks out Japanese ‘purikura’ photo booths with NPR’s Kat Chow. The photo booths produce selfies that you can decorate and print out, which predate Snapchat filters by at least a decade. Follow the link in our bio for the full video. (Credit: NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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NPR journalist Alina Selyukh makes oreshki, a cookie from the former Soviet Union, in the latest episode… read more
NPR journalist Alina Selyukh makes oreshki, a cookie from the former Soviet Union, in the latest episode of NPR Hot Pot series. The walnut-shaped cookies, which have a rich, nutty filling, were popular during a time when people had to make do with limited ingredients. Selyukh shares her memories of making it with her mother back in Samara, Russia, where she grew up.Feeling inspired? Share your own Hot Pot story by posting a food memory on Instagram, using the hashtag #NPRHotPot. (Credit: NPR) #RussianFood #SovietFood  #InternationalCuisine | © instagram.com/npr
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Chance The Rapper, fresh from a 23,000-strong, sold-out show the night before, brought a thoughtful and… read more
Chance The Rapper, fresh from a 23,000-strong, sold-out show the night before, brought a thoughtful and fresh take to his @nprmusic Tiny Desk concert. Follow the link in our bio to see the video. (Credit: @claireeclaire | Claire Harbage/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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NPR's Skunk Bear explores how the same process that makes fireworks explode, also powers your body. To… read more
NPR's Skunk Bear explores how the same process that makes fireworks explode, also powers your body. To see the full story, follow the link in our bio. (Credit: Skunk Bear/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Despite a high dropout rate and low test scores at Ballou High School in Washington, D.C., every senior… read more
Despite a high dropout rate and low test scores at Ballou High School in Washington, D.C., every senior was accepted to at least one college. ⠀⠀A strong support system within D.C. Public Schools made it a reality. For months and months, staff tracked students' success, often working side-by-side with them in the school library on college applications, often encouraging them to apply to schools where data show D.C. students perform well. ⠀⠀But it wasn't a year without struggle. More than a quarter of the teaching staff quit before the end of the school year — that's not usually a good sign. And out of the nearly 200 graduates, 26, are still working toward their high school graduation — hoping to earn their diploma in August.  Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @chelseabeck.psd | Chelsea Beck/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Writer Greg O'Brien and his daughter, Colleen, play with Adeline, Greg's 8-month-old granddaughter. Eight… read more
Writer Greg O'Brien and his daughter, Colleen, play with Adeline, Greg's 8-month-old granddaughter. Eight years ago, Greg was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. ⠀⠀When O'Brien found out he'd be a grandfather, he was excited but also sad. He knew his granddaughter would never know the real him. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @mererizzo | Meredith Rizzo/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Neuroscience isn't on many elementary school lesson plans. But this spring, a second grade class at Fairmont… read more
Neuroscience isn't on many elementary school lesson plans. But this spring, a second grade class at Fairmont Neighborhood School in the South Bronx is plunging in.⠀⠀The big mission: empower children growing up in poverty with the research-based tools to transform their own developing brains. And that means, in part, giving them the understanding that brains can indeed grow, change and heal.⠀⠀In the part of the South Bronx where Fairmont Neighborhood School is located, nearly half of families earn $25,000 a year or less, according to census data. That kind of poverty is inherently stressful, says Fairmont's principal, Scott Wolfson. "Some of our students are sleeping in shelters, or not even in shelters but on the streets," he says. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @kaitlinroseslattery | Kaitlin Rose Slattery for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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NPR’s Elise Hu (@elisewho) and Kat Chow thought they were going to a beginners' K-Pop dance class in… read more
NPR’s Elise Hu (@elisewho) and Kat Chow thought they were going to a beginners' K-Pop dance class in Seoul. You'll see how things went down in the latest installment of Elise Tries. Follow the link in our bio to see the full video. (Credit: NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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In a dual-language classroom, sometimes you're the student and sometimes you're the teacher. Here's what… read more
In a dual-language classroom, sometimes you're the student and sometimes you're the teacher. Here's what it's like for 6-year-old Merari. Follow the link in our bio for the full comic. (Credit: LA Johnson/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Chinese artist Ai Weiwei (@aiww) created ‘Trace’, a series of Lego portraits of activists and political… read more
Chinese artist Ai Weiwei (@aiww) created ‘Trace’, a series of Lego portraits of activists and political prisoners, while under house arrest. He wasn't allowed to travel to see the piece at the San Francisco debut. But now he has his passport back and was finally able to see it on display in Washington, D.C. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @beckharlan + @moogiem | Beck Harlan and Maia Stern/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Senior conservator of paintings Ann Hoenigswald works to fill in elements of Paul Cézanne's Riverbank… read more
Senior conservator of paintings Ann Hoenigswald works to fill in elements of Paul Cézanne's Riverbank c. 1895 in the National Gallery of Art's Paintings Conservation Lab in Washington, D.C. Armed with cotton swabs, strong solvents and a lot of training, conservators are entrusted with restoring priceless works of art. Check out our Story for more photos. (Credit: @liamjamesphoto | Liam James Doyle/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Wilma Consul brings us to the Philippines with Picadillo, a dish she made as a little girl, in this inaugural… read more
Wilma Consul brings us to the Philippines with Picadillo, a dish she made as a little girl, in this inaugural episode of NPR Hot Pot. The new video series is about the memories we associate with our favorite dishes. Picadillo is a Spanish dish popular in many former colonies of Spain and Filipinos call it ginisang giniling. Consul makes her version of the dish for NPR while sharing her memories of cooking this every day as a child. (Credit: NPR)Share YOUR food memories with NPR. Post a photo or video of you cooking or eating your favorite dish on Instagram with the hashtag #NPRHotPot and tell us what it reminds you of in the caption. We’ll feature a few of our faves on NPR.org. #Picadillo #FilipinoFood #InternationalCuisine | © instagram.com/npr
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NPR was there for 5-year-old Sam Marsenison's first day of kindergarten back in 2004. His parents wondered… read more
NPR was there for 5-year-old Sam Marsenison's first day of kindergarten back in 2004. His parents wondered if he was was ready. This month, as he graduated from high school, they're still asking that question. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @heyzak | Zak Bennett for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Ladi Adaikwu (right) and her business partner, Musa Ogbeba, run one of the few high-quality seed yam… read more
Ladi Adaikwu (right) and her business partner, Musa Ogbeba, run one of the few high-quality seed yam shops in central Nigeria. Yams are essential to the country's economy and culture, but their quality keeps declining. ⠀⠀Now, researchers have found a way to mass produce good seed yams like Adaikwu’s and it could save the industry. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @timothy.m.mcdonnell | Tim McDonnell for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Summer is traditionally a time when young people have a bit more independence and a chance to explore… read more
Summer is traditionally a time when young people have a bit more independence and a chance to explore and try new things. And there's a new generation of resources out there aimed at parents who want to make sure that teens are armed with the best possible information about their bodies, sex and relationships, so that they can make good decisions away from adult supervision. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: LA Johnson/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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We all have a future self, a version of us that is better, more successful. It can inspire us to achieve… read more
We all have a future self, a version of us that is better, more successful. It can inspire us to achieve our dreams, or mock us for everything we have failed to become. Follow the link in our bio to listen to the latest episode of NPR's Invisibilia podscast. (Credit: @marinamuun | Marina Muun for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Charlie and Adrienne Wilber are a father-daughter fishing team in Sitka, Alaska. Adrienne started fishing… read more
Charlie and Adrienne Wilber are a father-daughter fishing team in Sitka, Alaska. Adrienne started fishing with her father when she was about 11. Now the two work in tandem, sharing an instinctive rhythm born of the many years they've spent together on this boat.⠀⠀ This year, the numbers of wild king salmon returning to rivers to spawn are at an all-time low. In May, that led the Alaska Department of Fish and Game to temporarily shut down the commercial king salmon trolling season in southeast Alaska one month ahead of schedule. ⠀⠀Charlie says that has never happened in all the years he has been fishing. Check out our story for more photos. (Credit: @elissanad | Elissa Nadworny/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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First Eqbal Dauqan was shot at on the way to work. Then her house was destroyed by a bomb. That didn't… read more
First Eqbal Dauqan was shot at on the way to work. Then her house was destroyed by a bomb. That didn't deter this scientist.⠀⠀"In college, I would tell my friends that I wanted to pursue a Ph.D., and they would chuckle and ridicule the idea," says Dauqan, who is an assistant professor at the University Kebangsaan Malaysia at age 36. Born and raised in Yemen, Dauqan credits her "naughty" spirit for her success in a male-dominated culture. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @sanjitdas | Sanjit Das for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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A new book examines how federal government policies made it easier for minorities to open fast-food franchises… read more
A new book examines how federal government policies made it easier for minorities to open fast-food franchises than grocery stores. Today the landscape of urban America reflects this history. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @chris.kindred | Chris Kindred for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Positive Tomorrows is a small, privately-funded school in the heart of Oklahoma City, designed to meet… read more
Positive Tomorrows is a small, privately-funded school in the heart of Oklahoma City, designed to meet the needs of homeless children. The future of these students hinges on the one constant in their lives: the school, which addresses both education and basic needs.⠀⠀On the second day of school, a student asks Amy Brewer, the director of education for Positive Tomorrows, how she knew that he needed a backpack. Positive Tomorrows provides each student with a backpack and all the school supplies they need. Students are also provided with hygiene items, clothes, shoes and jackets as needed. Follow the link in our bio to see more photos and the full story. (Credit: @katiehayesluke | Katie Hayes Luke for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Surgery that severs the link between brain hemispheres reveals that those halves have way different views… read more
Surgery that severs the link between brain hemispheres reveals that those halves have way different views of the world. NPR's Invisibilia podcast asks a pioneering scientist what that tells us about human consciousness. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @okchickadee | Angie Wang for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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In 1980, soon after Soviet troops invaded Afghanistan, the Popal family fled the country. Eventually,… read more
In 1980, soon after Soviet troops invaded Afghanistan, the Popal family fled the country. Eventually, the Popals landed in America and rebuilt their lives. Today, the family owns several successful restaurants in Washington, D.C., including the acclaimed Lapis, which serves Afghan cuisine.  On a recent evening, they opened up Lapis to host a free dinner welcoming refugees in their city.⠀⠀"We came here exactly like these people – we had no place to stay," Zubair Popal recalls. He chokes up and takes a long pause before adding, "It reminds me of the days we came ... I know for these people it's very hard, very hard."⠀⠀The Welcome Refugees dinner is part of a campaign that encourages locals across the U.S. to host similar meals for refugees in their community — and to break barriers by breaking bread together. Check out our Story for more photos. (Credit: @beckharlan | Beck Harlan/NPR) #worldrefugeeday | © instagram.com/npr
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How the members of Algiers — four musicians in three cities on two continents — made an album for a world… read more
How the members of Algiers — four musicians in three cities on two continents — made an album for a world as divided and unsettled as they are. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit - Photos: Courtesy of the artist / Illustration: @sgonzalesart | Sarah Gonzales for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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In Silicon Valley, you're supposed to build businesses unapologetically. You're not supposed to speak… read more
In Silicon Valley, you're supposed to build businesses unapologetically. You're not supposed to speak out against injustice. Freada Kapor Klein breaks those rules. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @taliaherman1 | Talia Herman for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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In NPR's Elise Tries series, correspondent Elise Hu (@elisewho) tests out new experiences in East Asia.… read more
In NPR's Elise Tries series, correspondent Elise Hu (@elisewho) tests out new experiences in East Asia. In this episode: she undergoes pore vacuuming, a hot trend in Korean beauty that involves a suction pen excavating grime from your face. Follow the link in our bio for the full video. (Credit: NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Emily Harrington is a professional climber. In 2014, she was trying to reach the top of the tallest peak… read more
Emily Harrington is a professional climber. In 2014, she was trying to reach the top of the tallest peak in Southeast Asia, a little-known mountain called Hkakabo Razi that had been successfully climbed only once before.⠀⠀"We were on this ridge at about 18,100 feet, and it just dropped off on both sides about 4,000 feet," Harrington recalls.⠀⠀She could see the summit from the narrow ridge, but one of the more experienced climbers warned her that the final route to the top was going to be harder than anything they'd done up until this point.⠀⠀Was she really up for the final push? Or was it time to climb down? Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @isabel_seliger | Isabel Seliger for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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"We’ve seen so many elder statesmen of jazz go on way past the point of really being able to play even… read more
"We’ve seen so many elder statesmen of jazz go on way past the point of really being able to play even halfway decently," says vibraphonist Gary Burton, "and no one will tell them." For a long stretch of his early performing career, Burton was always the youngest man on the bandstand. He was all of 18 when he released his debut album. This spring Burton became something else altogether: a retiree. And at 74, still in possession of his quicksilver fluidity and deep intuition, he went on a farewell tour, visiting a small handful of cities that mean something to Burton, playing material that fit the same criteria. Follow the link in our bio to see the full video. (Credit: @JazzNight/NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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The maker of one medical treatment for opioid abuse has successfully lobbied statehouses around the country… read more
The maker of one medical treatment for opioid abuse has successfully lobbied statehouses around the country to pass policies that tilt addiction treatment practices in favor of the company's drug. Follow the link in our bio for the full investigation. (Credit: @kim.ryu | Kim Ryu for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Quidditch leapt from the Harry Potter books and movies to real-life muggle fields in 2005. Now, it's… read more
Quidditch leapt from the Harry Potter books and movies to real-life muggle fields in 2005. Now, it's grown big enough to have a major league, and the intensity and athleticism involved is anything but fictional. Check out our Story for more photos. (Credit: @jaredsoares | Jared Soares for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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NPR journalists David Gilkey and Zabihullah Tamanna died a year ago this week, ambushed on a remote road… read more
NPR journalists David Gilkey and Zabihullah Tamanna died a year ago this week, ambushed on a remote road in southern Afghanistan while on a reporting assignment traveling with the Afghan National Army.⠀⠀Since their deaths, NPR has been investigating what happened, and today we are sharing new information about what we learned. It’s a very different story from what we originally understood.⠀⠀The two men were not the random victims of bad timing in a dangerous place, as initial reports indicated. Rather, the journalists’ convoy was specifically targeted by attackers who had been tipped off to the presence of Americans in Afghanistan’s Helmand province.⠀⠀Gilkey, an experienced photojournalist, and Tamanna, an Afghan reporter NPR hired to work with him, were sitting together in a Humvee when they were attacked.⠀⠀“After the loss of our colleagues, we wanted to be sure we understood what really happened on the road that day,” said Michael Oreskes, senior vice president of news and editorial director at NPR. “So we kept reporting.” Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @isabel_seliger | Isabel Seliger for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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"Racial impostor syndrome" is a complicated emotion for many people. NPR’s Code Switch heard from biracial… read more
"Racial impostor syndrome" is a complicated emotion for many people. NPR’s Code Switch heard from biracial and multi-ethnic listeners on this topic who connect with feeling "fake" or inauthentic in some part of their racial or ethnic heritage. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @justsomekris | Kristen Uroda for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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NPR’s South East Asia correspondent Elise Hu (@elisewho) likes to test out new experiences. In this inaugural… read more
NPR’s South East Asia correspondent Elise Hu (@elisewho) likes to test out new experiences. In this inaugural episode of the video series Elise Tries, she visits a South Korean raccoon cafe. Things don't go as smoothly as planned. Follow the link in our bio for the full video. (Credit: @NPR) | © instagram.com/npr
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Ben Gapinski, 10, (center) is greeted by his parents Dan and Nancy Gapinski after getting off the school… read more
Ben Gapinski, 10, (center) is greeted by his parents Dan and Nancy Gapinski after getting off the school bus. When Ben was a toddler, he was diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder and needed constant monitoring to stay safe.⠀⠀The Gapinskis knew they needed help. They found a therapist to work with Ben for 24 hours a week, which cost more $50,000 a year. Dan's workplace insurance paid for some of the costs, but not all. So they turned to Medicaid. Ben's disability was severe enough – he was deemed by the state to require "an institutional level of care" — that he was eligible for Wisconsin's children's long-term care program, funded by Medicaid.⠀⠀While Medicaid is best known as a health care program for poor people, more than 80 percent of its budget goes to care for the elderly, the disabled and children, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. ⠀⠀The program has been growing in recent years and it now makes up almost 10 percent of federal spending. That's why it's the number one target in President Trump's proposed budget, and figures prominently in the Republican proposal to replace the Affordable Care Act. ⠀⠀Follow the link in our bio for the full story. (Credit: @sarastathas | Sara Stathas for NPR) | © instagram.com/npr