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Michael Urie was barely a year old when “Torch Song Trilogy,” a play about the complicated love and family… read more
Michael Urie was barely a year old when “Torch Song Trilogy,” a play about the complicated love and family lives of a drag queen named Arnold Beckoff, opened on Broadway in 1982. He had never heard of it until he was in high school in Plano, Texas. Then Harvey Fierstein, the playwright, and Moisés Kaufman, the director, asked him to play the part. “I never thought of myself as Arnold,” @michaelurielikesit said. “I thought they were insane.” There was something about this part that @michaelurielikesit said he found daunting. “In the first scene, the character is in drag,” he said. “And I thought, ‘I could never do that. I could never be that guy. I’m never going to be that free, that brave.’” Until this October, when the first New York revival of the play by @theharveyfierstein (now shortened in length, and title, to “Torch Song”) opened at @2stnyc, Michael had never seen a full production of it. And now he was starring in it — as Arnold, the role that @theharveyfierstein wrote for himself. “I run into people all the time who tell me that they saw this play in its original run and it changed their lives,” @michaelurielikesit said. “In fact, I got a letter the other day from someone who wrote, “I’ve been in love with Arnold for 35 years.’” @gab photographed @michaelurielikesit who will perform in “Torch Song,” which runs through December 9. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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The indigenous groups thought they had reached a deal: A vast landscape in the north of Yukon Territory… read more
Yukon
The indigenous groups thought they had reached a deal: A vast landscape in the north of Yukon Territory would be mostly set aside for preservation, with only a small percentage allotted to industrial development. But then the Yukon government decided to push aside a recommendation agreed to by a joint government-indigenous commission. Instead, it favored far more development in the wilderness, which has huge deposits of coal, gas and minerals. Now the 26,000 square miles of the Peel Watershed — an area where mountain sheep graze on the sides of snow-capped peaks, and grizzlies and wolves hunt caribou and moose along the banks of 6 pristine rivers — is at the heart of a legal battle before Canada’s Supreme Court. The case will also determine how much influence Canada’s #indigenous groups will have over land and natural resources in their traditional territories. The original agreement to protect 80% of the watershed from industrial development resulted from 7 years of study by the joint indigenous-government commission. The modern treaties were supposed to give 3 indigenous groups, or First Nations, a voice in deciding the fate of the watershed, one of the largest stretches of wilderness left in North America. The government says the recommendation from the commission is simply that — a recommendation and not binding. But the First Nations say the treaties are meaningless unless the recommendation is upheld. And environmentalists say that Canada’s legal system is flawed, because it ends up favoring resource extraction. A decision against the indigenous groups would reinforce this argument. The Supreme Court’s decision, expected soon, will have an impact far beyond #Yukon. @avelkaim photographed the #HartRiver, which runs through the Yukon’s Peel Watershed. Visit the link in our profile to read the full coverage. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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For generations, folk musicians have camped out on a dusty cattle range in the northern Indian state… read more
For generations, folk musicians have camped out on a dusty cattle range in the northern Indian state of Rajasthan. Mostly Muslims, they earn their keep by performing for Hindus who live in sturdy huts built of stone. So it came as no surprise when Aamad Khan, a poor singer with deep-set eyes, was summoned to a nearby temple one night to play his harmonium, an air-driven organ. He was told to use his music to inspire the Hindu goddess Durga to enter the body of a local faith healer who happened to smell of alcohol that September evening. The song would be Aamad’s last. Eventually, the faith healer confessed to killing him, saying he had murdered Aamad in a drunken rage. A week or so later, the folk musicians living in Rajasthan, who number about 200 with their families, did something they had never dared to try: They picked up and left. For hundreds of years, the folk musicians, known as Manganiyars, have been bound to perform for high-caste Hindus, absorbing discrimination and abuse and being paid little for it. As patronage systems have been dismantled in many parts of India, many Manganiyars have searched for a way out. Aamad’s family members said they were pressured to accept some money and not report the crime to the authorities. But talks over exactly how much money should be paid soon broke down, and Aamad’s family then jettisoned tradition and went to the police. “We wanted justice,” Kaiku Begum, Aamad’s widow, said between sobs. A few days after the criminal complaint was filed, all the Manganiyars living in Dantal left. According to Chugge Khan, Aamad’s brother, the decision to leave was partly about fear, but also an act of protest. “All that we have are our mouths,” Chugge said. “Now, we are trying to hold onto our dignity. We have decided not to live the life of insects anymore.” @lokeatul photographed Kaiku after her husband’s death. Visit the link in our profile to read the full story. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Hundreds of guests in Buenos Aires turned out for what may have been the wedding of the season, but there… read more
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Hundreds of guests in Buenos Aires turned out for what may have been the wedding of the season, but there was something different about this one. The ?? were actors, the wedding ? was inflatable and the ?  was plastic. This was no ordinary wedding. In fact, it wasn't a wedding at all, but a “falsa boda,” or “fake wedding,” and a really good excuse for a party. “The purpose of the ‘falsa boda’ is to convey joy and fun and live the happy moments related to love, without having to fall into the traditional ritual of what a marriage is,” explained Nacho Bottinelli, 30, one of the organizers. Real weddings have been on the decline in Buenos Aires as couples decide to live together or wait longer to marry. But Argentines still love a wedding. Even though the falsa boda isn't real, it includes a short and sweet ceremony. The ritual of placing a garter on the bride also gets a twist, with 10 single women and 10 single men from the crowd invited to give it a try. And what wedding party would be complete without the bride tossing the bouquet? The woman that catches it might be the next in line to get married. Or not. ? ?‍ @limauricio took this photo of 2 actors performing for guests. Visit the link in our profile to read more. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Where in the world is @nytimestravel? @seminarad took this photos of #horses while on assignment for… read more
Where in the world is @nytimestravel? @seminarad took this photos of #horses while on assignment for a story in this week’s issue. Where do you think he traveled to capture this scene? | © instagram.com/nytimes
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A gunman opened fire on parishioners at a small Baptist church in rural Texas yesterday, killing at least… read more
Sutherland Springs, Texas
A gunman opened fire on parishioners at a small Baptist church in rural Texas yesterday, killing at least 26 people and turning Sutherland Springs, a tiny town east of San Antonio, into the scene of the country’s newest mass horror. Officials said the slaughter was carried out with a military-style rifle by Devin Patrick Kelley, a 26-year-old who’d been discharged from the Air Force for bad conduct. He died shortly after the attack. His motive was unclear, but the grisly nature of it could not have been clearer: Families gathered in pews, clutching Bibles and praying to the Lord, were murdered in cold blood on the spot. The victims ranged in age from 5 to 72, and included several children, a pregnant woman and the pastor’s 14-year-old daughter. It was the deadliest mass shooting in the state’s history. At least 20 more were wounded. Last night, @heislerphoto took this photo of Jayanthony Hernandez, 12, center, as he was comforted by his mother, Mona Rodriguez, at a vigil at the #SutherlandSprings post office. Visit the link in our profile for updates on what we know about the #Texaschurchshooting. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Felix Rafael Cordero, 86, is a Korean War veteran, painter and photographer in Caguas, Puerto Rico. He… read more
Felix Rafael Cordero, 86, is a Korean War veteran, painter and photographer in Caguas, Puerto Rico. He evacuated his house before Hurricane Maria, and upon his return, he found everything was destroyed, including his studio, all his photographs, negatives, and paintings. “My home and life’s work were taken away,” he told the photographer Joseph Rodriguez (@rollie6x6). The catastrophic effects of #HurricaneMaria, which have arguably been exacerbated by the slow and indifferent response of the U.S. federal government, has left the island and its residents battered yet defiant, Ed Morales writes in #nytopinion. They are facing a yearslong process of recovery. @rollie6x6 took this portrait while on assignment in #Puerto Rico. Visit the link in our profile to see more photos of the isolation of a storm-ravaged island. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Walk into Code: 146 on a Saturday evening and you’ll find it packed with Liberian locals and expats who… read more
Monrovia, Liberia
Walk into Code: 146 on a Saturday evening and you’ll find it packed with Liberian locals and expats who want to hear aspiring artists at an open-mic night. “Everybody was there to have a good time,” said the Nigerian-born photographer @yagazieemezi, who found herself returning to the club time and again during a 10-month trip to #Liberia in the summer. “Regardless of what they were going through, people came to express the best versions of themselves; from their clothes to their performances. It didn’t really matter how much money they had.” Though she checked out a variety of venues during her visit, the casual atmosphere and the constant stream of fresh talent drew her to Code: 146 most weekends. The founder of Code: 146, Jonathan Koffa (@takunj), is one of Liberia’s most prominent hipco artists — a nod to the country’s take on American rap. “The people of Liberia know their history and remember their past,” @yagazieemezi said. “There is definitely a clear relationship between America and Liberia. Liberians take that influence and make it their own.” Visit the link in our profile to see photos inside Code: 146 — and to read more about the ease of Monrovia’s #hipco clubs. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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“What’s really funny about being National Youth Poet Laureate is that not everyone even knows it exists,”… read more
“What’s really funny about being National Youth Poet Laureate is that not everyone even knows it exists,” said @amandascgorman, who was given the honor in April. “I feel in many ways like a unicorn.” The 19-year-old poet, author and activist — photographed here by @itsmetonyluong — writes poetry with a cleareyed mix of autobiography, social issues and historical motifs picked up from the library at @harvard, where she’s a sophomore. Inspired by a speech that #MalalaYousafzai gave in 2013, @amandascgorman became a youth delegate for the @unitednations at 16. In 2014, she was named the inaugural Los Angeles Youth Poet Laureate. And the next year, she published her first poetry collection. She’s taking her new role seriously. “I did a lot of sitting back and thinking about what I wanted for myself and what I wanted for my country: more unity, more support for the arts and more opportunities for young writers from marginalized groups,” she said. She continues to lead @1pen1page, an organization she founded in 2016 that provides platforms “for student storytellers to change the world.” On her bucket list: the White House. “This is a long, long, faraway goal, but 2036 I am running for office to be president of the United States,” she said. “So you can put that in your iCloud calendar.” | © instagram.com/nytimes
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“I have never been able to resist ordering a side of breakfast sausage,” @ciaosamin writes in @nytmag’s… read more
“I have never been able to resist ordering a side of breakfast sausage,” @ciaosamin writes in @nytmag’s #Eat column this week. While cooking professionally, she spent years perfecting the balance of maple, sage and black pepper to satisfy her enduring craving for breakfast links.  But after returning to her tiny home kitchen, @ciaosamin explains that the “mere thought of setting up a meat grinder or sausage stuffer was enough to turn me vegetarian.” After realizing she’d never be satisfied with store-bought sausages, @ciaosamin came up with a solution: ditch all the steps involving grinding and casings and focus on the most important part of the process — getting the taste and texture of the sausage mixture just right. Visit the link in our profile to get the @nytfood recipe for maple breakfast sausage, photographed here by @andreagentl. These patties come together in the time it takes to make a frittata or a stack of pancakes for #brunch. #regram | © instagram.com/nytimes
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It’s not every day that you go shopping with Superman. But the @nytimesfashion writer Alex Williams did… read more
It’s not every day that you go shopping with Superman. But the @nytimesfashion writer Alex Williams did — and had no problem spotting @henrycavill. “Regardless of one’s age, gender or sexual orientation, it can be agreed that the man is a specimen, a 99.9999 percentile hunk, a super man," Alex Williams writes of the British actor. But here’s how @henrycavill sees it: “To put it in simple terms, I never had ‘game.’” In school, being chubby, he earned the nickname “Fat Cavill.” Now a fledgling A-lister, he’s starring in the superhero blockbuster-to-be @justiceleague alongside @benaffleck (Batman) and @gal_gadot (Wonder Woman). @tom__jamieson took this photo of #HenryCavill with a newfound, distinctly absurd mustache. “It’s for a role, Mission Impossible 6,” he said sheepishly. “But,” he added, “I’m also playing around with it now, growing it a bit longer. Why the hell not? When else am I going to grow a handlebar mustache?” | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Will Jones has been creating customized tours to Africa for more than 20 years. @wildphilanthropy is… read more
Will Jones has been creating customized tours to Africa for more than 20 years. @wildphilanthropy is his latest venture — an enterprise designed to build sustainable tourism with a mutually beneficial exchange between visitors and the people and land they visit. In Ethiopia’s #OmoValley, where @andyhaslamphoto captured this scene, the land is largely dry savanna. The discovery of human remains dating back nearly 2.5 million years prompted @unesco to dub the Lower Valley a #WorldHeritage site in 1980. But today the Omo is a region on the precipice. The Ethiopian government has recently completed the 3rd of 5 proposed dams upriver. The dams threaten to alter the lives of the communities that depend on the river’s moods for survival. “This was the second year in a row that the flood crop failed,” Will told @nytimestravel. “It is the only time anyone can remember that the river never rose.” The area has also fallen victim to hit-and-run tourism — people driving storming into villages, cameras blazing, then leaving in a cloud of dust. Visit the link in our profile to read more. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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For children from several villages in Northern Bangladesh, this boat — and others like it — holds their… read more
For children from several villages in Northern Bangladesh, this boat — and others like it — holds their classroom. For 3 hours at a time, they take reading, math, drawing and computer classes aboard the boat. The school runs 3 sessions a day with about 30 children in each class. After one session ends, a boat moves on to pick up the next students. These floating schools, run by a nonprofit organization, are intended for young children across the northwest of the country. They were launched in response to increasing flooding during the monsoon season. #Bangladesh is a delta placed at the confluence of many major rivers. It’s highly vulnerable to climate change and rising sea levels. Today, the schools run year-round on 54 boats, as flooding has increasingly affected this area and most schools haven’t been able to function on land. The photographer @ismailferdous took this photo of a floating school in Bangladesh. Visit the link in our profile to watch a 360 video shot aboard the boat. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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In her directorial debut, the writer and actress Greta Gerwig has created a character rarely seen onscreen:… read more
In her directorial debut, the writer and actress Greta Gerwig has created a character rarely seen onscreen: a young girl who loves herself. She’s acted in 25 films and co-written 5, but @ladybirdmovie is the most unadulterated distillation of her sensibility to date. The main character is a high-school senior (Saoirse Ronan) who lives in Sacramento and attends an all-girls Catholic school. “She’s a delicious and daring weirdo,” Christine Smallwood writes in @nytmag. She goes on: “She’s the girl — I’m stealing this from Ronan, who told me that she ‘admires’ the character — whom you didn’t even know you wanted to be.” Greta wrote @ladybirdmovie partly as a response to films about boys growing up. At @thenyff, she asked the crowd: “What is ‘Boyhood,’ but for a girl? What is ‘The 400 Blows,’ but for a girl? What is personhood for young women?” In most films, girls exist to be looked at. Sometimes they help a male protagonist come to a realization about himself. Sometimes they die. #GretaGerwig makes Lady Bird the one who looks: at boys but also houses, magazines, books, clothes and at the city of Sacramento. @erikmadiganheck took this portrait of Greta Gerwig — styled by @kattypaldos — while on assignment for @nytmag. #regram | © instagram.com/nytimes
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On a typical Friday afternoon, this small, deliberately unmarked mosque on the road out of Shelbyville,… read more
On a typical Friday afternoon, this small, deliberately unmarked mosque on the road out of Shelbyville, Tennessee, would be crowded with rows and rows of Somali men, praying between their shifts at the poultry plant. Last Friday, there were only around a dozen. A man at the plant had offered advice to his Somali co-workers: run your errands now. Then don’t go outside again until Sunday night. A coterie of white nationalists were headed to town for a “White Lives Matter” rally. After Friday prayers, the mosque’s imam explained how to contact the authorities in case of harassment, how to balance being a trusting neighbor with being vigilant, and how to use a smartphone camera to capture the identity of an attacker. The advertised purposes of the rally were to protest the presence of refugees, many of them Muslim, in Middle Tennessee, and to hold up as an omen for the future the shooting in September of 8 white people at a church in Nashville by a Sudanese-born man. The white nationalists considered themselves defenders of the faith. Religion was the common denominator of the whole, loud weekend. And it was perhaps through the worship services that one could best understand what happened. Visit the link in our profile to read more, and to see more photos by Johnny Milano (@grief). | © instagram.com/nytimes
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For decades, the artist Claes Oldenburg has been harnessing the everyday and turning it into the uncanny.… read more
For decades, the artist Claes Oldenburg has been harnessing the everyday and turning it into the uncanny. Now, at 88, he has his first show of new works in 6 years, this one at @pacegallery in Manhattan. Claes (pronounced “kloss”) has become best known for large public projects that turn ordinary objects — a scoop of ice cream, a shuttlecock, a paintbrush — into monumental sculptures. It was in the early 1960s, “after a couple of years in New York,” that he started shifting away from painting as an artist. “Everything changed,” he said of that era. “You could paint a very beautiful picture of somebody and nobody would care. Everybody was doing something different. It was explosive, and it was the beginning of a new period of art. You could do almost anything.” The @pacegallery exhibition, “Shelf Life,” on view until November 11, is comprised of relatively small works made of cardboard, plaster, steel and wood. How long does it take to make them? “It takes as long as it takes,” the artist told @nytimes. “I would say you put things together in maybe a week or two, and then pull them apart for a week, and then you find another idea that sneaks in and so on.” @sashafoto took this photo of #ClaesOldenburg in his Manhattan studio. Follow her to see more portraits. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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#JoshHutcherson is a sci-fi veteran, especially after playing Peeta Mellark in @thehungergames movies… read more
#JoshHutcherson is a sci-fi veteran, especially after playing Peeta Mellark in @thehungergames movies and a time-traveling janitor in @futuremanonhulu, which premieres later this month. But off camera, @jhutch1992 prefers a more earthbound existence, keeping his wardrobe and personal style pretty basic. “I’ve never set out and said, ‘I want this style now,’” the 25-year-old actor told @nytimesfashion. “Literally, I would say 85% of my clothes are from press tours.” That includes the outfit he's wearing in this photo taken by @bradtorchia. Visit the link in our profile to read more in @nytimesfashion. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Can you create and showcase independent films in a country that frowns on independence, much less dissent?… read more
Pingyao, Shanxi, China
Can you create and showcase independent films in a country that frowns on independence, much less dissent? “There is a level,” said Sun Liang, whose experimental film “Kill the Shadow” played at China’s newest film festival, in the ancient walled city of Pingyao, in Shanxi Province. “You don’t want to make something too violent or too inappropriate, to go over that level.” It is “probably like this in every country,” he added. Only it’s not. China’s grip on culture is as tight as it is on the media, politics and the economy. And if anything, that grip has grown even tighter under President Xi Jinping. The weeklong #filmfestival — where @giuliamarchiphoto took this photo of a light check — is the brainchild of China’s most celebrated independent filmmaker, Jia Zhangke, whose own work has fallen afoul of the censors before. But he says that independent filmmaking can still flourish in #China. “Nearly 800 movies are made in China every year,” he said, “among which there are many by talented young directors.” Visit the link in our profile to read more. #? | © instagram.com/nytimes
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As he tells it, Senator @BernieSanders of Vermont fell in love with the Canadian health system 20 years… read more
As he tells it, Senator @BernieSanders of Vermont fell in love with the Canadian health system 20 years ago when he brought a busload of his constituents across the border to buy cheaper prescription drugs. Now he wants to make Americans fall in love with his proposal to make the U.S. system a lot more like Canada’s. That’s one reason he took the equivalent of a busload of staffers, American health care providers and journalists to Toronto last weekend — a 2-day trip that was part immersion, part publicity tour. (@avelkaim, who took this photo at Toronto General Hospital, was one of those journalists.) @BernieSanders ended the trip with a speech: “What the U.S. Can Learn From Canadian Health Care.” But what did he learn from his weekend in Canada? He said the uniformity of one message stuck out to him: While Canada’s health care system is far from perfect, Canadians value fairness more than Americans do. “There really is, I think, a deep-seated belief in Canada that health care is a right, and whether you’re rich or whether you’re poor or whether you’re middle class, you are entitled to health care,” he said. Visit the link in our profile to read about 5 lessons #BernieSanders learned in #Canada. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Since Homer’s “Odyssey” first appeared in English, around 1615, in George Chapman’s translation, the… read more
Since Homer’s “Odyssey” first appeared in English, around 1615, in George Chapman’s translation, the story has prompted some 60 English translations. But Emily Wilson is the first woman to produce an English rendering of the poem. “The fact that it’s possible to translate the same lines a hundred different times and all of them are defensible in entirely different ways?” she said. “That tells you something.” The writer Wyatt Mason was floored when he read the first words of her “Odyssey.” What a translation is doing — and what it should do — has been a source of vigorous debate since there were texts to translate. Emily made small but radical changes to the way many key scenes of the epic are presented. (The first line of her translation: “Tell me about a complicated man.”) “If you’re going to admit that stories matter,” Emily said, “then it matters how we tell them, and that exists on the level of microscopic word choice, as well as on the level of which story are you going to pick to start off with, and then, what exactly is that story?” @geordiewood took this portrait of Emily Wilson for this weekend’s @nytmag. #regram | © instagram.com/nytimes
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How elaborate a space do we need to survive, to thrive? “I do believe in a certain amount of comfort,”… read more
How elaborate a space do we need to survive, to thrive? “I do believe in a certain amount of comfort,” said the artist @andreazittel. “I believe in having a good spot to position your body so you can relax and do things. But I want people to find their own comfort without being catered to.” @andreazittel has spent nearly 2 decades exploring #solitude. Now, she’s inviting others to join her. While on assignment for @tmagazine, Kate Bolick spent 7 days in one of the artist’s “Experimental Living Cabins” — the latest addition to A-Z West, a challenging sprawl of projects in #JoshuaTree National Park. “The point of the cabins isn’t to enact the now-clichéd off-the-grid adventure, but to exist just a few steps outside real life, in a stripped-down but completely functional environment,” Kate writes. For @andreazittel, maintaining this small empire — the cabins and other projects — has required endless endurance, extreme physical exertion and an obsessive ambition. She started her “Wagon Station Encampment,” a series of tiny dwellings without electricity or running water, in 2004. Inside each one is just enough space for a single person to sleep or sit up. @stefanruizphoto took this photo peeling inside one of them. Visit the link in our profile to read more — and to see more photos from #AZWest. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Every city wants a World Series victory. After Harvey, Houston needed one. And late last night, @astrosbaseball… read more
Houston, Texas
Every city wants a World Series victory. After Harvey, Houston needed one. And late last night, @astrosbaseball defeated the Los Angeles @Dodgers, capping a dramatic season that gave the city what many fans called a great mass distraction. It’s the first #WorldSeries title for the #Astros. Across Houston, people who were recently united by chaos and water were brought back together by a ballgame. They listened on radios because Harvey destroyed their televisions. They watched in gutted rooms missing walls and carpets because Harvey took their walls, carpets and everything else. They watched in motel rooms because Harvey made them refugees in their own city. “Of all times, what better time to win the World Series than right now,” said Waylon Doucett, who had roughly 72 inches of floodwater in his home just 9 weeks ago. His house is still a shell with bare concrete floors and exposed walls. His bed is still a mound of clothes in a back room. But in the euphoria last night, none of that seemed to matter. He jumped and danced and screamed on his porch with his friends and neighbors — including Fabian Godinez, left, and Eduardo Luna Lopez, who were photographed here by @scott.a.dalton. #⚾ | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Just about everyone, it seems, wants to take a long train trip. But what’s it really like? ? The writer… read more
Just about everyone, it seems, wants to take a long train trip. But what’s it really like? ? The writer @robertosimonson decided to travel from New York City to New Orleans by rail. Part of him wondered if the trip was a good idea. “I admit to being a romantic. I also admit to being a cynic,” he writes. “This means I am suspicious of my romantic tendencies. I’ve sentimentalized train travel all my life. Yet, after 3 decades of Amtrak trips, I still genuinely enjoyed it, so I concluded that my romanticism wasn’t entirely self-delusion.” Train travel presents a few immediate advantages over air travel. For one thing, all that time forces you to relax. And even in a “roomette” — like the 3’6” by 6’8” room where Robert stayed — you get more space than you do on a plane. But in his case, there were quite a few delays. “The charm of train travel lies in constant motion, minute-by-minute adventure,” he writes in @nytimestravel. “When that motion ceases, the charm evaporates.” Visit the link in our profile to read more. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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This is a mostly complete inventory of the times that sweet, sad Sam Smith (@samsmithworld) cried over… read more
This is a mostly complete inventory of the times that sweet, sad Sam Smith (@samsmithworld) cried over the course of 2 hours at the Chateau Marmont hotel in West Hollywood, where @ryanpfluger took this photo: He cried when he talked about the house he grew up in; when he reminisced about a crush who turned on him; when he talked about his first voice teacher. He cried when he talked about writing “Pray,” a song from his new album. He cried when he talked about the children he met in Mosul, Iraq, on a recent humanitarian mission. He cried talking about how much he cried when he watched the movie “Inside Out.” And he cried when he talked about love. At 25, @samsmithworld is trying to bare his soul. But a 25-year-old soul can be a volatile thing. “I just feel like I’m going to offend someone every time I open my mouth,” the British star told our writer @taffyakner. All he wanted was to remind people that love is love is love — particularly his brand of young adult love: ? love, ? love, the love from “The Notebook” and “Titanic.” It’s been more than 3 years since @samsmithworld’s first studio album, “In the Lonely Hour,” flung the planet’s brokenhearted face down upon their beds anew with its wet-pillowed, dark-soul despondence. His new album, “The Thrill of It All,” is a much-anticipated follow-up. Visit the link in our profile to read our full interview with #SamSmith. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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@javier_luengo_photo took this picture of Purullena village and #caves in Granada, Spain. The @nytimestravel… read more
@javier_luengo_photo took this picture of Purullena village and #caves in Granada, Spain. The @nytimestravel writer Doreen Carvajal decided to explore García Lorca’s literary inspirations in southern Spain. To search for the poet’s #Andalusia is to chase fragments of poetry and loss. #GarcíaLorca was silenced more than 81 years ago at 38 — murdered by a paramilitary death squad at the outset of the Spanish Civil War for his anti-fascist sentiments and homosexuality. But his powerful voice is still one that binds Spain. In August, his verses offered a measure of comfort after the deadly attack in Barcelona. Thousands of antiterrorism protesters listened to a recital of his tribute to his favorite thoroughfare: “The street where all 4 seasons live together. The only street I wish would never end.” When he was 18, he set off from Granada, his hometown, in 1917 on the first of 4 expeditions by steam train with his art history professor and other students to tour Andalusia. It was then, he said, that “I became fully aware of myself as a Spaniard.” He was seeking memories of “the ancient souls who once walked the solitary squares we now tread.” | © instagram.com/nytimes
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The 60-plus tunes Thelonious Monk is known to have written are some of the most beloved pieces in jazz’s… read more
The 60-plus tunes Thelonious Monk is known to have written are some of the most beloved pieces in jazz’s canon. That’s partly because they live just barely outside of its conventional language. In some sense, his songs present the #jazz musician’s perfect challenge. They’re opaque, lumbering and miraculously catchy. Played right, each passing harmony feels rich enough to last an entire song. But if you can’t make these pieces move, you’ve lost the battle. On the final 2 nights of a 10-day festival in North Carolina celebrating Monk’s 100th birthday, 2 of today’s great tenor #saxophonists put their hands on his music. From very different angles, they showed what makes him jazz’s most popular composer to cover, and one of its most difficult. @justincookphoto took this double-exposure image of @joshuaredmanmusic performing with a trio led by the pianist Ethan Iverson. The context was the same for the other saxophonist, Ravi Coltrane. But while @joshuaredmanmusic soloed with a smokestack effusiveness, getting underneath the melodies and setting them alight, Ravi Coltrane’s horn was liquid. It seemed to move freely on its own. Visit the link in our profile to read more. #? #? | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Earlier today, @heislerphoto took this picture of Caroline Ventura leaving flowers near the bike path… read more
Lower Manhattan
Earlier today, @heislerphoto took this picture of Caroline Ventura leaving flowers near the bike path in Manhattan where a motorist killed 8 people yesterday. As investigators continued looking into whether the attacker, Sayfullo Saipov, had ties to terrorist organizations, it became clear that those close to him had feared that he was heading toward extremism. He had been planning the attack for weeks and appeared to have connections to people who were the subjects of terrorism investigations, police officials said today. The attack was the deadliest act of terrorism in NYC since Sept. 11. Those killed came from as few as 6 blocks from where it started and as far as thousands of miles away: Nicholas Cleves, 23, of Downtown Manhattan; Darren Drake, 32, of New Milford, New Jersey.; Anne Laure Decadt, 31, of Belgium; and 5 Argentine tourists who traveled to New York for a 30-year high school reunion celebration. They were identified by the Argentine government as Hernán Mendoza, 47; Diego Angelini, 47; Alejandro Pagnucco, 47; Ariel Erlij, 48; and Hernán Ferruchi, 47. Please visit the link in our profile for ongoing updates to this story. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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We know the most valuable players. But who are the most valuable barbers of the #WorldSeries? After Yulieski… read more
We know the most valuable players. But who are the most valuable barbers of the #WorldSeries? After Yulieski Gurriel (@el_yuly10) of @astrosbaseball belted a 3-run homer against the @Dodgers on Sunday, he tossed off his helmet. His cut, called "La Piña" — the pineapple — for its tall, spiky sprout, received enthusiastic fluffs from his teammates. “La Piña, I think, was fundamentally Yuli’s idea,” said Danny Quiles, who’s known as the Astros’ unofficial barber. “But we didn’t think it was going to cause this sensation.” When Danny isn’t making home calls to player’s mansions, he’s at Cadillax Barber Shop, just outside of Houston. Right down the street, Rayzor Sharp owner Ray Davis has noticed a trend. “Just in the past 2 weeks, there’s been a lot of interest in getting Astros cuts,” Ray told @nytimesfashion. He styled Domonique Caples' tightly cropped braids with fading down the sides, photographed here by Michael Stravato. On one side: a shaved star, the #Astros logo. Visit the link in our profile to see more photos. #⚾ #✂️ | © instagram.com/nytimes
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The dancer and choreographer Preeti Vasudevan is paring down in her new autobiographical solo, “Stories… read more
The dancer and choreographer Preeti Vasudevan is paring down in her new autobiographical solo, “Stories by Hand,” at @nylivearts this week. She’s trained in the Indian classical dance form of #Bharatanatyam, but she won’t be wearing any ornate silks or bells. “When you see it like this you see the body,” @vasudevan.preeti said. “You see the breathing.” In her solo, which unfolds in 3 sections, she dances and talks, telling personal stories about contemporary life — not about gods and goddesses. “It’s like if I need to just be me and I want you to see this dance as something very approachable, then I need to have fun first and not make it educational for you,” Preeti said. In other words, it’s not your usual evening of Bharatanatyam. “It’s not that I’m rebelling,” she told the @nytimes writer @giadk. “It’s more like I just want to play. I’m trying not to make it precious.” @sbrackbill made this video for #SpeakingInDance, our weekly series exploring the world of #dance. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Her story went viral last year when she scooped a local homicide story. A source had tipped Hilde Lysiak… read more
Her story went viral last year when she scooped a local homicide story. A source had tipped Hilde Lysiak on the incident, a few blocks from her home in Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania. After confirming with the police, she immediately went to the scene. Now, the 10-year-old reporter is starring in a children’s book series based on her reporting experiences. Hilde works on the series with her father, Matthew Lysiak, a former reporter for @nydailynews. The Lysiaks moved from NYC to Pennsylvania when Hilde was 6, and soon after she started covering minor family events. But she quickly realized it “wasn’t getting me anywhere” and asked her dad if he could help her start a “real” newspaper. Today, her print circulation is close to 600 and she charges $20 for a yearlong subscription. Every summer, the Lysiaks send Hilde to camp for a few weeks to make sure she gets a break from reporting, and she spends her free time making slime, which “I find great joy in,” she said. @markmakela took this photo of Hilde delivering her monthly paper, The Orange Street News. Visit the link in our profile to read more. #? | © instagram.com/nytimes
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At least 8 people were killed when a man drove 20 blocks down a bike path beside the Hudson River in… read more
Lower Manhattan
At least 8 people were killed when a man drove 20 blocks down a bike path beside the Hudson River in Lower Manhattan this afternoon before he crashed his pickup truck, jumped out with fake guns and was shot by police officers. The motorist, driving in a Home Depot rental truck, hit numerous people as nearby Stuyvesant High School was letting out for the day, officials said. Federal authorities are treating the incident as a terrorist attack. Police said that after the attacker got out of the truck, he was heard yelling, “Allahu Akbar,” Arabic for “God is great.” @nycmayor Bill de Blasio said at a news conference: “Based on information we have at this moment, this was an act of terror, and a particularly cowardly act of terror aimed at innocent civilians.” @heislerphoto took this picture near the scene in Lower Manhattan. | This is a developing story. For updates, please visit the link in our profile. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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About 140 years ago, a botanist named Addison Brown noticed an unfamiliar plant growing around Red Hook,… read more
About 140 years ago, a botanist named Addison Brown noticed an unfamiliar plant growing around Red Hook, Brooklyn. As ships arrived, they dumped thousands of tons of ballast — earth and stones used to stabilize ships — carrying seeds from far-off lands. The red plant was Amaranthus crispus, or amaranth, which is native to South America. Now, “Seeds of Change,” an exhibition by the artist Maria Thereza Alves, uses plants like these to highlight the city’s hidden past. Maria has spent nearly 2 decades uncovering long-buried colonial histories using ballast seeds, which can lie dormant in the soil for hundreds of years. “I liked the idea that these plants were witnesses to things we would never understand, to paths of trade that we no longer have information about,” she told our reporter @correality. Maria, who lives in Berlin, visited NYC twice to do research. The first thing she learned: how little of New York is actually New York. Low-lying areas and marshland were commonly filled in with refuse, ashes, sand and ballast. Last week in Red Hook, where Addison Brown made his discoveries so long ago, @karstenmoran photographed this #amaranth, which is still growing wild in Red Hook. Visit the link in our profile to see more photos. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Halloween in El Sobrante, California, is an irony-free zone. It’s not that the town is overly serious… read more
Halloween in El Sobrante, California, is an irony-free zone. It’s not that the town is overly serious about the day. It’s that the people who decorate their homes with skeletons, witches and dismembered torsos aren’t overly serious about their decorations. “No one’s trying to be witty here,” says @timothy_archibald, a photographer and a longtime resident. “They’re just trying to say it.” And one other thing: “They’re not doing it to be photographed.” But photographed they are. For the past several years, @timothy_archibald has made a point of documenting how his neighbors in the community north of Berkeley celebrate the holiday. He seems to prefer Halloween to the other holiday that tends to inspire lawn decorations: Christmas. Homes decked out for Christmas are often garish, he said, and rarely folksy. And there is a broader difference. “The Halloween stuff,” he said “never gives you a tingly, ‘Oh, life is beautiful’ feeling.” It wasn’t clear whether he thought that was a good thing or a bad one. #? #LensBlog | © instagram.com/nytimes
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@nytfood's chocolate peanut butter cups — photographed by @craigleephoto — are dangerously simple to… read more
@nytfood's chocolate peanut butter cups — photographed by @craigleephoto — are dangerously simple to make, with just a few ingredients that you probably have in the pantry right now. They come together faster than a trip to the convenience store. And they’re completely customizable. Once you’ve gotten your fill of the standard #peanutbuttercup, try honey-sweetened cashew butter cups. Or cinnamon-spiked almond butter cups. You could even sneak a tiny dollop of raspberry jam underneath the peanut butter layer for another delightfully classic pairing. The possibilities are endless. Visit the link in our profile to get @samanthaseneviratne’s #NYTCooking recipe — and 17 more #Halloween recipes. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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A Monday morning #commute, as captured by our staff photographer @jamesestrin. When he spotted this pair… read more
A Monday morning #commute, as captured by our staff photographer @jamesestrin. When he spotted this pair early this morning, @jamesestrin was on his way to the @nytimes building in Midtown Manhattan. “This motorcycle with a basket in the back with a dog passed and my only thought was, ‘Does the dog have a seat belt?’” he said. “‘Is there a dog seatbelt?’ And if there’s not a dog seat belt, should someone invent one?” Outside, it was “drizzling and miserable and generally bad traffic,” @jamesetrin said. “But this was very smile-worthy.” #?#regram | © instagram.com/nytimes
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It was maybe the longest buildup in movie history. But more than 3 decades after he last appeared onscreen,… read more
It was maybe the longest buildup in movie history. But more than 3 decades after he last appeared onscreen, some 2 hours into “Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” there was Luke Skywalker. Standing at a cliff with a solemn look on his face, the weathered hero was about to receive his lightsaber from Rey, the young heroine, when the story ended. If this was a bittersweet moment for fans — an abrupt, tantalizing preface to “The Last Jedi,” which opens December 15 — imagine how it felt for Mark Hamill. @hamillhimself has always embraced his #StarWars legacy, but when he was invited back, he hesitated: “I was just really scared,” he said. When Harrison Ford said yes, though, he realized he had to agree, too. “Can you imagine if I was the only one to say no? I’d be the most hated man in nerd-dom.” The series defined and dominated the 66-year-old actor’s career. The franchise went into periods of hibernation, then came roaring back and restored him to relevance when he least expected it. “I’m such a fraud,” he told our reporter Dave Itzkoff with a theatrical air. “But I’m enjoying all the residual attention that the movie’s getting. I should be, by all rights, puttering in my garden with a metal detector, telling kids to get off my lawn. What’s not to love?” Visit the link in our profile to read the full interview, and to see more portraits of #MarkHamill by @tlillegraven. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Where in the world is @nytimestravel? The photographer Rodolphe Escher captured this scene while on assignment… read more
Where in the world is @nytimestravel? The photographer Rodolphe Escher captured this scene while on assignment for a story in this week’s issue. Where do you think Rodolphe was when he took this photo? #?? | © instagram.com/nytimes
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In #Ireland, the departed stay present. You might still come across old-timers who recall how families… read more
In #Ireland, the departed stay present. You might still come across old-timers who recall how families in rural stretches would clean the house and set out a drink on the first night of November — the eve of All Souls’ Day — in the belief that the dead would return. Respect for burial grounds runs deep, with crowds gathering in their local cemeteries once a year to pray as a priest blesses the dead within. This reverence for the grave may derive from centuries of land dispossession, or passed-on memories of famine corpses in the fields and byways, or simply be linked to a basic desire expressed by the planting of a headstone: To be remembered. Our reporter @danbarry1958 visited Tuam, Ireland — a town whose very name conjures the buried dead. (It’s derived from a Latin term for “burial mound.”) From 1925 to 1961, Tuam was the site of the St. Mary’s Mother and Baby Home. Inside, nuns kept watch over unmarried mothers and their children. Sinners and their illegitimate spawn, it was said. The fallen. Decades later, a local historian exposed this property’s appalling truth: Hundreds of babies born to unwed mothers died there. “I couldn’t understand it,” said Catherine Corless, the woman whose research prompted a national reckoning. “The horror of the idea.” Watch our Instagram Story to read more from @danbarry1958, to see more images by @pdossantos and to watch a video by @kassiebracken. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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“I’ve never been one for haunted houses: I’m jumpy, and when I scream, people think a baroness has fallen,”… read more
“I’ve never been one for haunted houses: I’m jumpy, and when I scream, people think a baroness has fallen,” writes @mrisaacoliver. But on a frightfully warm October weekend, he was brave enough to visit 4 haunted houses: “a seaside inn, a crazed colonial town, an 18-room fever dream and a fully-staged warehouse abduction.” Now in its 13th season, @bloodmanornyc — the aforementioned fever dream — caters to an older, clubgoing set in Manhattan. No doughnuts, no cider. For 20 minutes, @mrisaacoliver “fended off attacks from an ax-wielding contortionist, an undead stripper dancing across from, well, a dead stripper impaled on her pole, and a doctor who leapt across his operating table toward me, growling, ‘It’s just you and me, big guy.’” #BloodManor, which was photographed here by @jessierocks, has themed rooms and a labyrinth filled with beasts, demons and deranged clowns. It’s not, to say the least, for the faint of heart. (It’s also not for those under 14.) Visit the link in our profile to read about 3 more #Halloween frights in the NYC region. #? | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Perhaps grown-ups are too old to go trick-or-treating, but they deserve #Halloween treats, too. This… read more
Perhaps grown-ups are too old to go trick-or-treating, but they deserve #Halloween treats, too. This absurdly easy recipe came to @nytfood from Colin Alevras, then the chef at the Tasting Room in New York. Until it closed in 2008, the Tasting Room offered #RiceKrispies treats every day — and they made more for Halloween. Their original recipe called for one bag of marshmallows, but @nytfood’s @juliamoskin updated it to call for 2 bags. The result should be a chewier, gooier treat. To elevate your own Rice Krispie squares even further, try browning the butter. It’ll add just an extra couple of minutes to the process. And, as you can guess by looking at this photo by @craigleephoto, it’s worth it. #?? | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Lucas Peterson’s trip on the Shosholoza Meyl Premier Classe train in #SouthAfrica provided the ultimate… read more
Lucas Peterson’s trip on the Shosholoza Meyl Premier Classe train in #SouthAfrica provided the ultimate in affordable luxury: For 3,195 rand (a total of about $235), @staletwizzlers, @nytimestravel’s frugal traveler, had his own air-conditioned sleeper compartment, a shower and a proper dining car serving multicourse meals. Such comforts were welcome; his #train journey from Johannesburg to Cape Town took 26 hours. “Trains force your brain to slow down,” @staletwizzlers writes. “With no internet access and the knowledge you’ll be on a train for an entire day, you have to mine your creative resources.” He spent a decent amount of time just looking out the window, as the scenery gradually morphed from the grassy, steppe-like plateau in the heart of the country to the craggy Hex River Mountains in the southwest. And he interacted with his traveling companions. “I usually travel by plane, an environment where people are usually slightly harried and irritated,” he writes. “Here, it was the opposite: We chatted, drank coffee, relaxed and counted ourselves lucky to take part in such a special journey.” @alexiawebster captured this scene from aboard the Shosholoza Meyl Premier Classe train. Visit the link in our profile to read more about @staletwizzlers’s meditative train ride through #SouthAfrica. #? | © instagram.com/nytimes
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More than 20 years ago, a precocious teenage girl made a surprising request of Margaret Atwood. She’d… read more
Toronto, Ontario
More than 20 years ago, a precocious teenage girl made a surprising request of Margaret Atwood. She’d just read “Alias Grace” and found herself entranced by the true story of Grace Marks, a 19th-century Irish immigrant and servant who became a celebrity “murderess” in Toronto. So she sent the novelist a letter seeking the movie rights. The correspondent was Sarah Polley. A Canadian child star from “Road to Avonlea,” she was years away from becoming a screenwriter and director. @therealmargaretatwood declined. Obviously. “She was 17!” she said. Now, at 38, #SarahPolley is the writer and a producer of a 6-part mini-series adaptation of the novel, which comes out on @netflix on next week. “Alias Grace” arrives at a time of peak #Atwood. @hulu’s “The Handmaid’s Tale” recently became the first streaming-service show to win an Emmy for best drama. And as the stormy political climate continues to churn in the U.S., the Canadian writer’s 2 decades-old novels have landed like contemporary critiques. “‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ offers us a window into a possible future when women’s rights are eroded,” Sarah said. “‘Alias Grace’ offers a look at what it was like before women had any rights. To look back and forward is very important at this moment when women’s rights are incredibly precarious and fragile.” @ian_patterson photographed #MargaretAtwood with Sarah Polley in Toronto. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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This week @nytmag is all about the art of the dinner party. “A dinner party to me is just dinner, served… read more
This week @nytmag is all about the art of the dinner party. “A dinner party to me is just dinner, served to a crowd that can ebb or flood depending on the season or the weather, on whether a call went out or a work schedule changed,” writes @nytfood’s @samsifton. He and his wife started hosting dinner parties years ago: They’d put the call out on a weekend morning: “You free for dinner?” Eventually the calls started coming in rather than going out: “You cooking tonight?” Their style of entertaining requires flexibility in planning. “When all are welcome, people bring other people. So you will want to ask your guests to bring beverages and flowers and other markers of good cheer. Asking helps underscore the message of the night: We’re all in this together.” @samsifton always asks for dessert. And as the chef, he leans toward dishes that can easily be spread across more portions than you’d planned — you can call the result an expandable feast. “I like tacos for that, huge salads, lots of potatoes.” Here, @pedenmunk photographed the main course of a @samsifton #dinnerparty: slab-bacon tacos with all the fixings, ideal for a lively table crowded with guests both expected and not. Visit the link in our profile to read more — and to dig into more @nytmag dinner parties in this week’s issue. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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The photographer @martaiwanek captured some early-morning mist over the Margaree River on Cape Breton… read more
Nova Scotia
The photographer @martaiwanek captured some early-morning mist over the Margaree River on Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia. Every October, 2 significant migrations take place on the Margaree. First: Hundreds of Atlantic salmon return to their natal river to spawn after a year — sometimes longer — spent in the ocean. Second: Anglers from all over the world flock to the #Margaree in the hopes of catching one of those salmon. On the first evening of the writer Monte Burke’s weeklong trip to the Margaree, he sat on the riverbank and watched 6 anglers fish a stretch of water on the lower portion of the river. Salmon were playfully leaping, but no one could persuade one to take a fly. To be sure, there are easier places in the world to catch an #AtlanticSalmon. In Europe, Iceland, Russia and most other provinces in Canada, most salmon rivers are private — which means they offer both solitude and more fish. Those luxuries come at a cost, though. The Margaree, on the other hand, is public, like all salmon rivers in #NovaScotia. It can get crowded, but anglers share the water by moving through the pools in an affable conga line so that everyone gets a fair chance. Visit the link in our profile to read more. #? | © instagram.com/nytimes
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A Rohingya woman and her child returning to an internment camp in Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State… read more
A Rohingya woman and her child returning to an internment camp in Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar. An overwhelming body of published accounts has detailed the Myanmar Army’s campaign of killing, rape and arson in Rakhine, which has driven more than 600,000 #Rohingya out of the country since late August. The @unitednations is calling it the fastest displacement of a people since the Rwanda genocide. But in Myanmar, and even in Rakhine itself, there is stark denial that any ethnic cleansing is taking place. Government officials, opposition politicians, religious leaders and even local human-rights activists have become unified behind this narrative: The Rohingya are not rightful citizens of Buddhist-majority #Myanmar, and now, through the power of a globally resurgent Islam, the minority is falsely trying to hijack the world’s sympathy. @adamjdean took this photo of a Rohingya woman and child who are still trapped in Myanmar. They are 2 of about 120,000 Rohingya who are confined to camps in central Rakhine, where Myanmar’s government has blocked aid agencies’ access; tens of thousands more Rohingya are also in desperate conditions in the north of the country. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Less than 2 decades ago, few people in the southwestern Chinese city of Chengdu had even heard of the… read more
Less than 2 decades ago, few people in the southwestern Chinese city of Chengdu had even heard of the term hip-hop — “xiha” in Chinese — let alone listened to it. In the late 1990s, when access to the internet and pirated videos became more widespread, locals began to discover the genre. Some stumbled upon the music through @nba mixtapes; others through watching break-dance, or B-boy, videos. But in recent months, #hiphop — the music, the culture and the fashion — has stormed the Chinese mainstream. Fans are flocking to nightclubs and music festivals to see their favorite local rappers and DJs perform, and English terms like flow, freestyle and even diss have made their way into popular urban parlance. Perhaps nowhere is this more apparent than in #Chengdu, a sprawling metropolis of nearly 16 million that’s best known for its pandas and mouth-numbing spicy food. “One theme that really resonates here is money,” said Andre Alexander, also known as @harikiri, a British music producer and DJ based in Chengdu. For example, in a popular song by the @higherbrothers, the current breakout stars of the Chinese hip-hop, one rapper boasts: “My chains, my new gold watch / made in China.” @bdentonphoto took this photo of concertgoers dancing under lights at the PAC HouTou GO hip-hop festival in Chengdu last month. Visit the link in our profile to read more. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Protesters said they splattered red liquid onto the base of the bronze statue outside the American Museum… read more
American Museum of Natural History
Protesters said they splattered red liquid onto the base of the bronze statue outside the American Museum of Natural History in Manhattan this morning because they view #TheodoreRoosevelt as an emblem of “patriarchy, white supremacy and settler-colonialism.” The protesters, who identified themselves as members of the Monument Removal Brigade, later published a statement online calling for its removal. “Now the statue is bleeding,” the statement read. “We did not make it bleed. It is bloody at its very foundation.” The statue of #Roosevelt, a conservationist, has stood outside the @amnh since 1940. Created by James Earle Fraser, and owned by the city, it depicts Roosevelt astride a horse and flanked by a Native American and an African-American. Long regarded as a politician who battled corruption, challenged monopolies and championed Civil Service, Roosevelt has also been criticized for his views of certain peoples as inferior and his defense of colonial expansion. @jeenahmoon took this photo of the statue earlier today. Visit the link in our profile to read more. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Spit-grilled chicken (pollo a la brasa) is popular all over Latin America. But it’s the Peruvian version… read more
Spit-grilled chicken (pollo a la brasa) is popular all over Latin America. But it’s the Peruvian version that’s best known in the U.S., buoyed by the many restaurants that serve the bird in all its burnished, garlic-scented, drippings-slicked glory. It’s usually served with a spicy, creamy #cilantro sauce that is the perfect complement — and delicious in its own right. But #Peruvian chicken is worth learning to make at home. (After all, few things beat the crackling skin of a home-roasted chicken, especially when it’s been marinated in garlic, chiles and plenty of spices.) In this @nytfood recipe, a full 6 cloves of garlic ensure its pungent dominance, while chile pastes lend plenty of complex heat. Once the chicken is done roasting, slather the sauce — this one uses feta cheese for a salty bite — liberally over the bird. The combination of spiced, crispy chicken skin and the creamy herb sauce is magical — particularly when it’s been made by you. Visit the link in our profile to get @nytfood’s recipe for Peruvian roasted chicken with spicy cilantro sauce, photographed here by @andrewscrivani. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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“I remember making a promise to myself, ‘Don’t change, don’t change, remember where you come from. But… read more
“I remember making a promise to myself, ‘Don’t change, don’t change, remember where you come from. But change is inevitable.” Hitting bottom after a string of macho roles in major movies, Colin Farrell has found fulfillment — and the best reviews of his life — in oddball films. A decade ago, the 41-year-old was playing the generic action hero, or trying to. He drew middling reviews and cemented a reputation as a badly behaved bed hopper with an insatiable appetite for alcohol and drugs. He entered rehab the moment his last big film, “Miami Vice,” wrapped. But rather than lick his wounds, the Irish actor came back soulful and small, with “In Bruges” and “Crazy Heart.” Since then, he has veered into art house territory, starring in “The Lobster” and now “The Killing of a Sacred Deer.” With the 2 films, #ColinFarrell — photographed here by @nadineijewere — put in the most deadpan performances of his career. And today, his personal life centers on his sons, his home in LA, yoga (“I said I love it, I didn’t say I’m doing it”), and saunas. When he spoke to @nytimes reporter @carabuckley8 in London, he was aching to be back home. “I say this as someone who is really aware of how fortunate I am. The world’s smallest violin should not play for me,” he said. “I’m just ready to step away from all of it.” | © instagram.com/nytimes
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A changing climate is turning the olive oil business into an increasingly risky one. Gone are the days… read more
A changing climate is turning the olive oil business into an increasingly risky one. Gone are the days when farmers could count on the mild “mezze stagioni,” or half-seasons, that olives rely on before and after the heat. Gone, too, is a reliable cycle: one year good, the next year not-so-good. Extreme weather is making olive oil production far more erratic just as global demand is growing. This year, a summer heat wave in Europe was the latest calamity. As the supply of olive oil from the #Mediterranean becomes more unpredictable, some bottlers are looking elsewhere as future sources of oil. “For the future we don’t know what to do,” one farmer, Riccardo Micheli, told @nytimes. “One year, it’s too much rain. Other year, it’s too much heat. Next year, who knows?” The photographer @massimoberruti took this photo of harvesters gathering olives at Capezzana, another estate in Prato, Italy. Visit the link in our profile to read more about how climate change has affected #OliveOil production. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Capping a year of national mourning, #Thailand will cremate its celebrated King Bhumibol Adulyadej on… read more
Capping a year of national mourning, #Thailand will cremate its celebrated King Bhumibol Adulyadej on Thursday evening. The $90 million ceremony will symbolize both the bountiful devotion of his subjects and the earthly abundance of what many consider the world’s wealthiest monarchy. When he died at 88 on October 13 last year, the king, also known as Rama IX, was the world’s longest-reigning royal. During his 7 decades on the throne, he helped guide a nation prone to chronic coup-making and spasms of political violence. The cremation is considered the concluding chapter in a journey that will return the divine monarch to the mystical Mount Meru, the heavenly heart of the Buddhist and Hindu realm. Since King Bhumibol’s death, millions of Thais have limited their wardrobes to black and white. Our photographer @adamjdean captured mourners in #Bangkok, where residents have folded more than 10 million flowers made of sandalwood, whose scent is believed to guide souls to the afterworld. Visit the link in our profile to read more about the $90 million cremation ceremony. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Maya Lin’s breakout moment came like a thunderbolt at the start of her career in 1981. The artist and… read more
Maya Lin’s breakout moment came like a thunderbolt at the start of her career in 1981. The artist and architect was still an undergrad at Yale when her design was chosen for the high-profile Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington. Her design initially caused intense controversy. But since completion, the black granite walls have been acclaimed for creating a place of calm and healing. #MayaLin went on to become one of the most cerebral and fascinating of today’s generation of American architects. Seeing a lot of her work would require considerable hopscotching. But southern New England offers a compact opportunity to see 4 significant pieces. Maya went to Yale College in the late 1970s, later receiving an architecture degree there. It seemed natural when @yale turned to Maya in the late 1980s to mark the 20th anniversary of coeducation at the school, which once admitted only male students. The artist came up with an unconventional approach for her commission, designing a “water table” with a thin layer of water that streams over the oval-shaped face of the sculpture. Our photographer @cenicola0 captured that work, “The Women’s Table,” here. Visit the link in our profile to learn where to (really) experience the art of Maya Lin — and the meditation and reflection it inspires. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Mark Morris’s “Layla and Majnun,” a story of unrequited love, smells like teen spirit. “Our parents are… read more
Mark Morris’s “Layla and Majnun,” a story of unrequited love, smells like teen spirit. “Our parents are keeping us apart,” said Nicole Sabella (@bellabewell), a dancer with @markmorrisdance, of her duet with Domingo Estrada Jr. “We sort of rebel against them.” In this moment, @domingoestradajr explained, “We finally get to physically touch.” But the pair is doomed from the start. “The tragedy isn’t that they don’t match up,” said #MarkMorris. “The tragedy is that they’re taken away and the world doesn’t have them anymore.” Opening tomorrow as part of the White Light Festival, “Layla and Majnun" — a chamber arrangement of the 20th-century #Azerbaijani opera by Uzeyir Hajibeyli —  features sets and costumes by #HowardHodgkin and the Azerbaijani singers @alimqasimovofficial and @farganaqasimova, who perform with the Silk Road Ensemble. “I didn’t want to do, as I call it, airport gift-shop multiculturalism,” Mark told the @nytimes writer @giadk. “It’s not a corrective, it’s not political. I’m not trying to teach anybody a lesson. I’m trying to do the opposite. Everybody knows this. So open up.” @adamgolfer made this video for #SpeakingInDance, our weekly series exploring the world of #dance. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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“I was so afraid it would explode on its own,” said 15-year-old Falmata B. Northeastern Nigeria, now… read more
Nigeria
“I was so afraid it would explode on its own,” said 15-year-old Falmata B. Northeastern Nigeria, now in its 8th year of war with Boko Haram, has become a place afraid of its own girls. According to @unicef, more than 110 children have been used as suicide bombers since the start of the year — at least 76 of them girls. Bombers in Maiduguri, the center of the battle against Boko Haram, have struck mosques, marketplaces, checkpoints and other places people gather. The deployment of children has become so common that officials are warning citizens to be on the lookout for girl bombers. The @nytimes reporter @dionnesearcey interviewed 18 girls in Nigeria who were sent on suicide missions by Boko Haram. Far from having been willing participants, the girls described being kidnapped and held hostage. All of them recounted how armed militants forcibly tied suicide belts to their waists, or thrust bombs into their hands, before pushing them toward crowds of people. Most were told that their religion compelled them to carry out the orders. And all of them resisted. @adamfergusonphoto photographed Falmata B., and other girls who survived #BokoHaram. Watch our Instagram Story or visit the link in our profile to see more. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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“They said to me, ‘Are you going to sleep with us, or do you want to go on a mission?’” — Aisha, 15 |… read more
Nigeria
“They said to me, ‘Are you going to sleep with us, or do you want to go on a mission?’” — Aisha, 15 | So far this year, Boko Haram militants in #Nigeria have carried out more than twice as many suicide bombings than they did in all of 2016. According to @unicef, more than 110 children have been used as suicide bombers in 2017 — at least 76 of them girls. Aisha was one of them. She fled her home with her father and 10-year-old brother, but Boko Haram caught them. The fighters killed her father and, soon after, strapped a bomb to her brother. Later, she learned that he’d blown up soldiers at a barracks. The militants told her not to cry for him. “He killed wicked people,” they told her. Later, they tied a bomb on Aisha, too. She said she’d considered walking off to an isolated spot and pressing the detonator, to avoid hurting anyone else. Instead, she persuaded soldiers to remove the explosives from her body, delicately. “I told them, ‘My brother was here and killed some of your men,’” she told our reporter @dionnesearcey. “My brother wasn’t sensible enough to know he didn’t have to do it. He was only a small child.” @adamfergusonphoto photographed Aisha and other girls who survived #BokoHaram. Watch our Instagram Story or visit the link in our profile to see more. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Northeastern Nigeria, now in its 8th year of war with Boko Haram, has become a place afraid of its own… read more
Nigeria
Northeastern Nigeria, now in its 8th year of war with Boko Haram, has become a place afraid of its own girls. The @nytimes reporter @dionnesearcey interviewed 18 teenagers who were captured by militants there and sent into crowds to blow themselves up. “I really didn’t expect to survive,” said Maryam, who’s 16. “I thought I had only minutes to live.” Maryam said she got help from an old man resting under a tree. The 2 hollered to one another from a safe distance, so that he could question her first and get some assurances that she didn’t plan to blow him up. For Maryam and other girls, even approaching the authorities to ask for help was exceedingly dangerous. Soldiers and civilians at checkpoints are on high alert for anyone suspicious — and usually that means any woman or girl, most of whom wear long head scarves and garments that could cover an explosive belt. In just the last 3 months of 2016, the @unitednations says, 13 children from 11 to 17 years old were killed after they were wrongly thought to be suicide bombers. @adamfergusonphoto photographed Maryam and other girls who survived #BokoHaram. Visit the link in our profile to see more. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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@jeszmann photographed the boundary of North Cotabato, Maguindanao, and Bukidnon — the heartland of the… read more
@jeszmann photographed the boundary of North Cotabato, Maguindanao, and Bukidnon — the heartland of the island of Mindanao, in the Philippines. The leader of ISIS in the Philippines is dead. And after months of scorched-earth combat, the city his forces seized, Marawi, on Mindanao, is all but completely back in government hands. But ISIS’s influence in the #Philippines is far from over, and communities on #Mindanao are bracing for the next battles. Today, old and resilient militant cells in the area are being strengthened by the brand and resources of ISIS’s international network. That has people all over Mindanao worried — including some of the Muslim militants whose former comrades joined ISIS. Visit the link in our profile to read more. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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On a quiet, expensive Beirut street, the dog walkers began to appear. It was precisely that moment in… read more
Beirut, Lebanon
On a quiet, expensive Beirut street, the dog walkers began to appear. It was precisely that moment in a Mediterranean evening when the light turns golden and the bougainvillea blossoms seem to glow from within. The lengthening shadows magnified a series of lumps on the sidewalk. On closer inspection, they were hills of poop. Jad Nawfal, 34, paused with his German shepherd, Boiko. “To Lebanese people,” Jad said, wrinkling his nose, “it’s kind of embarrassing to pick up poop.” If it’s not on their personal property, he said, “They just don’t care.” Dog poop on city streets seems like a small problem, but as it turns out, it reflects many of Lebanon’s larger ones. Civic activists say that years of sectarian violence and lawlessness, and the ensuing mistrust, destroyed Lebanon’s sense of shared public space, whether physical or political. In spite of that, or because of it, a loose-knit coalition — an underdog movement, dare we say — has sprung up to battle the problem of soiled streets in Beirut. @diego.ibarra.sanchez photographed a man playing with his dog there one evening earlier this month. Visit the link in our profile to read more. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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As the sun set in the shantytown of La Perla in Old San Juan, #PuertoRico, Ramón Marrero, 79, slumped… read more
Old San Juan
As the sun set in the shantytown of La Perla in Old San Juan, #PuertoRico, Ramón Marrero, 79, slumped onto the unwashed cot inside his brother’s tool shed. That’s where he’d lived since Hurricane Maria claimed his home. A single light bulb illuminated the other contents of the bare, musty room: 2 plastic chairs piled with clothes, canned fruit and vegetables, and a single gas burner. Ramón draped a towel over his bare back to fend off the mosquitoes. Earlier, he’d walked to the post office to charge his cellphone and mobile battery pack. The only electricity he’d seen since the storm came from an extension cord connected to a shared generator donated by @luisfonsi, the Puerto Rican pop singer. Like Ramón, other residents of La Perla have been using fallen branches to fuel bonfires for cooking. Lorel Cubano, the director of a local nonprofit, said most of the aid the neighborhood has received came from private citizens and celebrities. “The government hasn’t arrived here,” she said. @dennismanuel photographed Ramón making a home out of the tool shed. Visit the link in our profile to read more stories of Puerto Ricans who’ve had to get creative to survive after #HurricaneMaria. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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At first glance, the coal city of #Datong in northern #China displays the hopeful signs of change that… read more
At first glance, the coal city of #Datong in northern #China displays the hopeful signs of change that President Xi Jinping had in mind when he promised his nation a new “China dream.” Rows of shiny solar panels have mushroomed on farmland ruined by mining. (@bdentonphoto captured these solar panels outside the village of Xiaoyaotou.) Some 74,000 villagers are being moved into newly built apartments. A drive to clean up government has brought the arrest of several city officials who grew rich on kickbacks. In an agenda-setting report at a Communist Party congress in Beijing this past week, #XiJinping held out a new dream of a China that would become cleaner, more prosperous and fairer in sharing the benefits of its increasing wealth. To succeed, the China dream has to take root in rural and rust-belt backwaters like Datong, where many of China’s almost 1.4 billion people still live. But to hear locals in this former capital of China’s coal industry tell it, the bustling scenes of construction mask a stark disconnect between bright promises and their hardscrabble reality. The China dream, they say, has yet to deliver what they need most: better jobs, improved health care and affordable housing. Visit the link in our profile to read more. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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A conversation with @julienrbaker veers quickly toward the philosophical and theological. “Music is everything,”… read more
A conversation with @julienrbaker veers quickly toward the philosophical and theological. “Music is everything,” the singer and songwriter told our reporter Jon Pareles. “Evidence of the divine. The possibility of man to be good. The possibility of improving our surroundings and expressing ourselves. All of these things are collapsed together in my mind.” The 22-year-old writes sparse, devastating ballads and sings them with a voice that’s both richly melodic and disarmingly natural. Her lyrics chronicle sadness, doubts, self-destructive urges, frail physical and mental health and a constant reckoning with faith. And her melodies often have a hymnlike solidity. @julienrbaker — who was photographed here by @ericryananderson — grew up in a religious family. At 17, she came out as gay, expecting the worst. But instead, her father combed the Bible for passages about love and acceptance. On Friday, @julienrbaker marks the release of her 2nd album, “Turn Out the Lights,” with a concert at @townhallnyc. “I usually don’t know the capacities of the venues, because I’ve asked not to know, because it freaks me out,” she said. “Sometimes I hear how many people are going to be at a show and I think, ‘Oh my gosh, I can’t play to that many people!’ But it gets easier every time.” | © instagram.com/nytimes
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“Does the world need another crisp smashed potato recipe?” you ask. @nytfood’s answer is yes. These smashed… read more
“Does the world need another crisp smashed potato recipe?” you ask. @nytfood’s answer is yes. These smashed potatoes with fried onions and parsley are the best. (And the crispiest. Make them. You’ll be so happy.) Regular olive oil works if you don't have chicken fat around, but this recipe is so good that it's worth roasting a chicken. A few tips: Don’t over-steam the potatoes or they’ll fall apart. But don’t under-steam or you’ll never be able to crush them. Also, let the potatoes cool a bit before you smash them so they dry out a bit; this, too, helps them stay intact. Finally, the chicken fat (or oil) must be very hot. If it’s not hot enough, it’ll soak into the potato rather than crisp it.This #NYTCooking recipe — photographed by @krausfoto6 — is adapted from "Dining In: Highly Cookable Recipes" by @alisoneroman. Visit the link in our profile to get all of the details. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Where in the world is @nytimestravel? The photographer @evansungnyc took this photo while on assignment… read more
Where in the world is @nytimestravel? The photographer @evansungnyc took this photo while on assignment for a story in this week’s issue. Where do you think he traveled to capture this scene? #?? | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Claes Oldenburg, 88, is one of the last remaining founders of the Pop juggernaut that plowed into art… read more
Claes Oldenburg, 88, is one of the last remaining founders of the Pop juggernaut that plowed into art history in the early 1960s. His contemporaries — Warhol, Lichtenstein — are almost all deceased. As Claes approaches his 9th decade, he has slowed his once-furious pace of productivity, but he’s still at work on public projects and large-scale sculpture. He’s finishing a private commission in California called “Dropped Bouquet,” and he’ll have a show of new works at @pacegallery this month in New York City. Because of the impact of Claes’s work on successors as varied as @jeffkoons and Rachel Harrison, it’s easy to forget just how radical his work was when it first appeared. It expanded the definition of sculpture by making it somehow more human and more cerebral at the same time, "a feat that has kept it resonant in a rapidly changing art world," writes @bklynkennedy. Pieter Hugo took this portrait of #ClaesOldenburg at the downtown NYC studio he has kept since 1971, a 5-story warehouse where naval propellers were once manufactured, for #TGreats17, @tmagazine’s annual issue celebrating the people its editors admire. Visit the link in our profile to read about how the sculptor is (still) changing what art looks like. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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An ostrich, illuminated by the headlights of a vehicle at the Ox Ranch near Uvalde, Texas. This ranch… read more
An ostrich, illuminated by the headlights of a vehicle at the Ox Ranch near Uvalde, Texas. This ranch is not quite a zoo, and not quite an animal shooting range, but something in between. The ranch provides a glimpse into the future of the mythic #Texas range — equal parts exotic game-hunting retreat, upscale outdoor adventure, and breeding and killing ground for exotic species. Animal-rights activists are outraged by ranches like this one. They call what goes on there “canned hunting” or “captive hunting.’’ Lawyers for conservation and animal-protection groups say that allowing endangered animals to be hunted undermines the Endangered Species Act and that the ranches’ financial contributions fail to benefit wildlife conservation. “We ended up with this sort of pay-to-play idea,” said Tanya Sanerib, a senior attorney with the Center for Biological Diversity. “It is absolutely absurd that you can go to a canned-hunt facility and kill an endangered or threatened species.” Visit the link in our profile to see more photos from the Ox Ranch, by @danielberehulak. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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In a place of rare creatures, these #kangaroos are among the rarest. They’re off limits to hunters at… read more
In a place of rare creatures, these #kangaroos are among the rarest. They’re off limits to hunters at the Ox Ranch; instead, they greet arriving guests and are often fed corn by the newcomers and by guides. But such is not the case for the African bongo antelope, one of the world’s heaviest and most striking spiral-horned antelopes. About 30 of them live at the Ox Ranch. The price to kill one? $35,000. Last fall, a hunter shot a bongo. “Taking one paid their feed bill for the entire year, for the rest of them,” said Jason Molitor, the chief executive of the Ox Ranch. The ranch is not quite a zoo, and not quite an animal shooting range, but something in between. Some see the ranch as a place for sport and conservation. Some see it as a place for slaughter and hypocrisy. Ranchers in the nation’s top cattle-raising state have been transforming pasture land into something out of an African safari, largely to lure trophy hunters who pay top-dollar kill fees to hunt exotics. Zebra mares forage here near African impala antelopes, and it’s easy to forget that downtown San Antonio is only 2 hours to the east. Recently, the photographer @danielberehulak visited the ranch while on #nytassignment. Visit the link in our profile to see more of his photos. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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@danielberehulak photographed a worker replacing a light bulb at Ox Ranch, which is not quite a zoo,… read more
@danielberehulak photographed a worker replacing a light bulb at Ox Ranch, which is not quite a zoo, and not quite an animal shooting range, but something in between. A 2007 report from @tamu called the exotic wildlife industry in America a billion-dollar industry. At the Ox Ranch, in #Texas, it shows. It has luxury log cabins, a runway for private planes and a 6,000-square-foot lodge with stone fireplaces and vaulted ceilings. More animals roam its 18,000 acres than roam the @houstonzoo, on a tract of land bigger than the island of Manhattan. But because the industry is largely unregulated, there’s no official census of exotic animals in Texas. And the Ox Ranch needs no local, state or federal permit for most of their exotic animals. State hunting regulations don’t apply to exotics, which can be hunted year-round. The ranch’s hunting guides and managers walk a thin, controversial line between caring for thousands of rare, threatened and endangered animals and helping to execute them. Visit the link in our profile to read more. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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On a ranch at the southwestern edge of Texas Hill Country, a hunting guide spotted her cooling off in… read more
On a ranch at the southwestern edge of Texas Hill Country, a hunting guide spotted her cooling off in the shade: an African reticulated giraffe. Such is the curious state of modern Texas ranching, that a giraffe among the oak and the mesquite is an everyday sort of thing. “That’s Buttercup,” said the guide, Buck Watson. In a place of rare creatures, Buttercup is among the rarest; she is off limits to hunters. The Ox Ranch, near Uvalde, Texas, is not quite a zoo, and not quite an animal shooting range, but something in between. Here, the African bongo antelope, one of the world’s heaviest and most striking spiral-horned antelopes, roams the same countryside as Buttercup. The price to kill a bongo: $35,000. Himalayan tahrs, wild goats with a bushy lion-style mane, are far cheaper: $7,500. An Arabian oryx is $9,500; a sitatunga antelope, $12,000; and a black wildebeest, $15,000. “We don’t hunt giraffes,” Buck said. “Buttercup will live out her days here, letting people take pictures of her. She can walk around and graze off the trees as if she was in Africa.” We sent @danielberehulak to the Ox Ranch, where he took this photo of Buck and Buttercup. Visit the link in our profile to read more. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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After nearly 1 full term, Chirlane McCray has fully wrapped herself in the role of political spouse.… read more
After nearly 1 full term, Chirlane McCray has fully wrapped herself in the role of political spouse. As the African-American wife of a white mayor in a moment of renewed racial strife across America, she’s emerged as most likely the most influential @nycfirstlady in the city’s history. She has a full-time staff of 5 and her own public schedule. She oversees a portfolio of municipal programs, including her signature $850 million mental health initiative. She controls an independent nonprofit with a $25 million annual budget. And she has the mayor’s ear on decisions big and small. In an @nytimes interview, @nycfirstlady outlined her ambitious agenda. “I want to be clear,” she said, “that my job is to make systemic change.” Her schedule can read like a map of multiculturalism in New York: opening a 24-hour center for LGBTQ youth in Queens, touring an urban farm in East Harlem, a Hispanic heritage event at Gracie Mansion one night and a transgender theater performance another. “There’s demands, there’s expectations, there’s traditions, and then there’s what I want to do,” she said with a laugh. @demetrius.freeman photographed #ChirlaneMcCray in the backyard of Gracie Mansion. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Park Chan-wook, who turns 54 this fall, is arguably South Korea’s most famous film director, known nationally… read more
Park Chan-wook, who turns 54 this fall, is arguably South Korea’s most famous film director, known nationally and internationally for his 2002-05 Vengeance trilogy, “Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance,” “Oldboy” and “Lady Vengeance.” Those films helped bring Korean cinema to the world stage and established Park as a fearless investigator of the violence in people’s hearts. Quentin Tarantino counts him as one of his favorite filmmakers, and @officialspikelee admired “Oldboy” so much that he remade it in 2013. Now, Park has turned his attention to sex. Last year, he released his newest film, “Aghassi,” or “The Handmaiden,” an adaptation of Sarah Waters’s 2002 novel “Fingersmith,” which has been hailed internationally as an erotic masterpiece. The film is so popular in Korea that it has inspired a bulletin board devoted to fan fiction, fan-made tribute art, badges, stickers, handkerchiefs, stationery, letterheads and even a rap song with dialogue from the movie set to hip-hop beats. “I’ve never felt the love of fans this way,” he says. Oh Suk Kuhn took this portrait of #ParkChanWook at the Ganghwa Anglican Church outside Seoul for #TGreats17, @tmagazine’s annual issue celebrating the people its editors admire. Visit the link in our profile to read more. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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“I remember being overwhelmed by Iceland's moonscapes and unique geography on my first visit years ago,”… read more
“I remember being overwhelmed by Iceland's moonscapes and unique geography on my first visit years ago,” our photographer @joshhaner writes. Then he found out why Iceland looks the way it looks: It lost most of its trees more than a thousand years ago, when #Viking settlers took their axes to the forests that covered a quarter of the countryside. More recently, Iceland’s picturesque vistas have helped fuel a tourism boom. But with that beauty comes a problem that Icelanders have faced for centuries. The lack of trees, coupled with the ash and larger pieces of volcanic rock spewed by eruptions, has led to severe soil erosion. With vegetation unable to gain much of a foothold, farming and grazing have been next to impossible in many parts of the country. And the loose soil, combined with Iceland’s strong winds, has led to sandstorms that can further damage the land. Reforestation could help. And as climate change has become a greater concern, Iceland’s leaders see it as a way to help the country meet its climate goals. But despite years of replanting, Iceland isn’t making much progress. “Once the trees are gone,” our reporter @henryfountain writes, “it’s no easy task to bring them back.” Visit the link in our profile to read more and to see more scenes from #Iceland. #regram | © instagram.com/nytimes
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“When I was growing up, you could be a nurse, a missionary’s wife, a secretary, and then, oh, how exciting,… read more
“When I was growing up, you could be a nurse, a missionary’s wife, a secretary, and then, oh, how exciting, you could be an air hostess,” Jane Goodall, 83, told the @nytimes reporter @melenar. “A lot of people said to me, don’t you want to be an air hostess?” She did not. Instead, she became Dr. Goodall, the famed primatologist and conservationist. A new documentary, “Jane,” details her early life and accomplishments. It’s based on more than 100 hours of footage, shot in the 1960s for @natgeo and hidden in its archives since. The cameraman was Hugo van Lawick, who arrived to document @janegoodallinst’s life among the chimpanzees in Gombe, #Tanzania, and left as her husband. “I actually hadn’t imagined that there could be anything new out of all that footage,” @janegoodallinst told @nytimes. “So many documentaries have been made about me.” But when she saw this one, it took her right back to who she was. “I loved watching the growing closeness between me and Hugo at Gombe, and the happiness of our wedding and birth of our son,” she said. “And it was healing to suddenly realize, with hindsight, how the end of our marriage was, in a way, inevitable — and for the information we both could share with the world, very important.” @gab took this portrait of #JaneGoodall while on #nytassignment. Visit the link in our profile to read more about the never-before-seen footage. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Race relations have been a central component in many of this year’s major news stories in the United… read more
Race relations have been a central component in many of this year’s major news stories in the United States. White nationalists rallied in Charlottesville, Virginia, after the City Council voted to remove a statue of Robert E. Lee., and black athletes have protested police brutality and racial injustice by kneeling during the national anthem. Amid that climate, @thedailyshow host @trevornoah joined @johneligon, an @nytimes correspondent who writes about race, for a conversation about race and identity. “People who don’t like you won’t like because you stand for something,” @trevornoah said. “If everybody likes you then you’re doing nothing,” he went on. “So for me it comes with the territory. Love me or hate me, but don’t be indifferent.” This discussion was part of Get With The Times, a new @nytimes event series for college students. @carascophoto took this portrait of #TrevorNoah at the event, which was live streamed from @northwesternu to watch parties at college campuses across the U.S. Visit the link in our profile to read more. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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A worker cleaning Lychee Bay in Guangzhou, China. The misleadingly named stream once reeked with the… read more
A worker cleaning Lychee Bay in Guangzhou, China. The misleadingly named stream once reeked with the liquid waste from homes and a bronze foundry nearby. A concrete covering even failed to contain the smell. And that wasn’t Guangzhou’s only problem. A decade ago, the city in southeastern China had a reputation as one of the country’s grimmest, with smoggy skies, chronic traffic jams and foul-smelling streams. Today, Guangzhou still grapples with pollution and a wide wealth gap, but it has cleaned up many of its earlier problems. Now, it's home to a 192-station subway system and a glittering cultural district, including an acclaimed opera hall. The cleaned-up bed of what was once one of its vilest streams is now lined with coffee shops and souvenir stores. In fact, the area has become so clean that it now attracts tourists. #Guangzhou represents one possible vision of China’s future. But Beijing may still ignore it. Visit the link in our profile to see more of @billyhckwok’s photos. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Vermont’s outdoors is a salve and a muse for Joe Mulherin, photographed here by @gretarybus. His right… read more
Vermont’s outdoors is a salve and a muse for Joe Mulherin, photographed here by @gretarybus. His right arm is covered in tattoos of the state flower, the state fish, the state seal, the loon from the reservoir (“They don’t know how hard I ride for them,” he said, referring to the loons). But just as often he’s indoors. In the basement of his parents’ house, he has spent the last few years recording scathingly beautiful hip-hop-influenced emo music as @nothingnowhere. Today, @nothingnowhere will release “Reaper,” an outstanding album that synthesizes the second-wave emo of the early to mid-2000s with the rattling hip-hop low end of the last few years. It is one of the most promising pop albums of the year, writes @joncaramanica, a pop music critic for @nytimes. The lyrical rawness of “Reaper” — Joe’s proper full-length debut album, and his first on a record label — can be searing. “There’s a lot of instances on this record where I probably should have just taken a nap,” he said. Visit the link in our profile to read more about how @nothing,nowhere is blending hip-hop and emo to make tomorrow’s pop. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is the rare novelist to become a public intellectual, as well as a defining… read more
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is the rare novelist to become a public intellectual, as well as a defining voice on race and gender for the digital age. “We Should All Be Feminists,” her 2012 #TEDTalk, has been viewed over 4 million times. Over the last few years, her books have appeared on thousands of required-reading lists in the U.S. In Nigeria, where she and her husband live for half the year, @chimamanda_adichie is considered a national icon. Quickly after her success, she founded a writing workshop where aspiring Nigerian writers spend a few weeks every year workshopping with her and a coterie of international writers she brings to Lagos. In 2009, Dave Eggers was one of them. He interviewed @chimamanda_adichie for #TGreats17, @tmagazine’s annual issue celebrating the people they admire. “I’ve known Adichie for about 10 years now, and she has always been startlingly easy to make laugh,” he writes, “and one of her very favorite subjects for ridicule is the exalted reputation of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.” The artist @carriemaeweems — who’s known for her 1990 #TheKitchenTableSeries — took this portrait of #ChimamandaNgoziAdichie in that style. Follow @tmagazine to read a #Tmicronovel written by @chimamanda_adichie exclusively for the magazine. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Last year, there were 84 sales and more than 100 exhibitions at @christiesinc’s New York location alone.… read more
Christie's
Last year, there were 84 sales and more than 100 exhibitions at @christiesinc’s New York location alone. They involved art and other precious goods worth almost $2 billion. The number of details that go into creating any one of those events is complicated. A thousand decisions, visions and revisions are involved: What humidity level does this piece require? How long will that shipment take to get through customs in Hong Kong? Getting something from Point A (probably a warehouse) to Point B (Christie’s) is just the beginning. And the next thing you know, Christie’s is filled with antique furniture, sculpture, paintings, vases, wine vessels, snuff bottles and royal robes. Our video journalist @maeryan took a tour of #ChristiesNewYork during the frenetic days and hours leading up the Fine Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art auction. What she witnessed: a few dragons, an art handler who loves raves and an auctioneer with a predilection for Humpty Dumpty. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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When Xi Jinping, China's most powerful leader in 40 years, endorses a philosopher, people rush to take… read more
When Xi Jinping, China's most powerful leader in 40 years, endorses a philosopher, people rush to take action. That's why the city of #Guiyang built a theme park dedicated to Wang Yangming, the Confucian scholar who’s depicted in this statue, photographed by @lamyikfei. When Wang spent 3 years in exile in Guiyang in the early 16th century, the city was a remote outpost on imperial China’s southern border. Now it's the capital of one of China’s poorest provinces, and it's trying to position itself as a center of big data — and traditional culture. As part of that mission, officials in and around the city have also constructed a museum dedicated to Wang's achievements, turned a small cave into a shrine that honors him and commissioned a robot that brings him to life. Visit the link in our profile to read more. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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#tbt from @nytarchives | 175 detectives, 29 subjects for the daily lineup and several police officials… read more
#tbt from @nytarchives | 175 detectives, 29 subjects for the daily lineup and several police officials were delayed 42 minutes when Tige — “the greenest-eyed cat that ever came to Centre Marketplace,” police headquarters in Manhattan — had quadruplets near the fingerprint file room, @nytimes reported in October 1936. Tige had become the official police cat 3 months earlier, our article explained. She displaced another named Inky, who had "slunk away in a fit of sullen jealousy" when Tige, an expectant mother, received considerably more attention. @nytimes noted that even “lobster-trick reporters” — journalists working the graveyard shift — found time to buy her hamburgers. And so when 2 detectives heard Tige mewing at 3:02 a.m., they investigated and didn’t return to their work for 42 minutes. And when they did, it was “a little embarrassedly,” our article noted. Tige had had kittens — 4 of them — and @nytimes reported that “mother and babies were doing well.” Here, we can see one of Tige’s kittens getting catalogued. Despite its cuteness, this photo, taken by a staff photographer, did not accompany our article in print. #? #? | © instagram.com/nytimes
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There are pop stars with no filter, and then there’s @kellyclarkson, a music-industry unicorn. “I don’t… read more
There are pop stars with no filter, and then there’s @kellyclarkson, a music-industry unicorn. “I don’t want to be trained to talk,” the 35-year-old said in an unsurprisingly blunt interview with @nytimes pop music editor Caryn Ganz. “I’m not a puppet, I have a brain.” She’s hoping that her latest album, “Meaning of Life,” out next week, speaks loudly, too. Leaving behind the pop-rock that became her signature sound in favor of the soul that has captivated her since her youth in Texas, @kellyclarkson is asking her audience to leap with her into more mature, nuanced sonic and emotional territory. After winning the first season of “American Idol” in 2002, she became one of the show’s few discoveries with staying power. She has collected 3 Grammy Awards, notched 11 Top 10 singles and sold nearly 18 million copies of the 7 albums she released on @rcarecords, her previous label. It’s impossible to make it through a night of karaoke without hearing her quintessential kiss-off anthem, “Since U Been Gone.” But it’s maybe even more remarkable that #KellyClarkson has remained a major pop player for a decade and a half without checking the usual pop-star boxes. Visit the link in our profile to read more, and to see more portraits by @kyledreinford. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Just 7 years ago, the Harlem School of the Arts was $2 million in debt and temporarily closed. Today,… read more
Just 7 years ago, the Harlem School of the Arts was $2 million in debt and temporarily closed. Today, @hsanyc has not only recovered, but is pivoting from a place that primarily provided arts education for children to a full-fledged performing arts center. “We will always be rooted in providing arts training to children. That will never waver,” said Eric Pryor, the president and chief executive of the nonprofit. “However, when children are available to you after school and on Saturdays, what are you doing weekdays?” he said. “What are you doing after 6 p.m. on weekends? Who are you during those moments?” The leaders of the school, which was founded in 1964, whisper phrases like “Harlem’s Lincoln Center” and “cultural hub” and aspire to be a place for artistic and cultural enrichment for a broad audience. @hollypickettpix photographed Ariyanna Munford, 10, during a @hsanyc ballet class taught by Briana Reed, who performed with @alvinailey. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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For decades, the Belgian fashion designer @driesvannoten has created sumptuous fashion for thinking women.… read more
For decades, the Belgian fashion designer @driesvannoten has created sumptuous fashion for thinking women. This year, @tmagazine selected him to be featured in its annual “Greats” issue. In July, @hanyayanagihara walked with him through his gardens outside Antwerp, where the photographer @jackie_nickerson photographed him. “The 55 acres surrounding the designer’s house have been planned so that some part of the grounds will always be fecund and some part will always be fallow: birth following death following birth,” writes @hanyayanagihara, @tmagazine’s editor in chief. “The effect is like moving through the botanical realization of a symphony — one section ends and the next begins, so that while you experience the garden as a whole, there are certain passages brighter with coloratura than others.” For anyone who knows and appreciates @driesvannoten’s clothes, the gardens feel both familiar and startling, she writes. “Familiar because in them, one finds the colors, the unexpected juxtapositions, that one recognizes in his designs; startling because it is rare to see, in such an intimate way, the origins of a creative mind’s inspirations.” And @driesvannoten’s great gift is color. Visit the link in our profile and follow @tmagazine to read more. #TGreats17 | © instagram.com/nytimes
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To revamp the most boring superhero in the @marvel pantheon, the company turned to an eccentric indie… read more
To revamp the most boring superhero in the @marvel pantheon, the company turned to an eccentric indie filmmaker from New Zealand who’s known for his handcrafted, quirky comedy-dramas “Boy” and “Hunt for the Wilderpeople.” Will Americans like the view inside @taikawaititi’s head? 394 days before the scheduled release of “Thor: Ragnarok,” @taikawaititi enjoyed acting like someone still not quite used to his role. “Every morning,” he confided, “I get in the car and think, Man, they still don’t know that I don’t know what I’m doing.” He laughed, a high-pitched giggle. “They still haven’t cottoned on!” The 42-year-old — photographed here by @emilyshur for @nytmag — is just the latest in a long string of upstart directors handed the keys to some of the world’s most expensive entertainment machines. Directing a $180 million superhero movie requires a daunting set of skills, many of which have little to do with framing a shot. But thanks to @taikawaititi’s dogged geniality, the 84 days of principal photography for #ThorRagnarok were, according to basically everyone, pretty fun. “Shooting a movie should be fun! It’s not a real job,” he said. “It can be hard, but at the end of the day we’re dressing up and playing pretend.” Visit the link in our profile to read more in @nytmag. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Grapes are the world’s largest fruit crop. Much of it goes into the rich and various world of winemaking.… read more
Grapes are the world’s largest fruit crop. Much of it goes into the rich and various world of winemaking. But in his latest column for @nytfood, @ottolenghi is more interested in how grapes can be used in the kitchen. “The characteristics that make wine so complex — they can be tart, sweet, fresh, earthy and fruity — also come into play when cooking and baking with grapes,” he writes. This #flatbread, which is based on Italian schiacciata, has a jammy grape topping to stand up to #Gorgonzola and fresh thyme. The combination of #grapes, sweet spices and blue cheese is an unusual one, yet utterly delicious — especially for the kind of person who loves ending a meal on a sweet and cheesy note. @ottolenghi serves it for brunch, or before dinner with drinks. Consider making it soon: The black grapes, like Concords, that you’ll need for this recipe come into season in the fall. #? | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Last March, 5 women gathered near Albany to enter a secret sisterhood they were told was created to empower… read more
Last March, 5 women gathered near Albany to enter a secret sisterhood they were told was created to empower women. To gain admission, they had to give their recruiter — or “master” — naked photos or other compromising material. They were warned that such “collateral” might be publicly released if the group’s existence were disclosed. The women belonged to a self-help organization called #Nxivm. Sarah Edmondson, one of the participants, said she’d been told she would get a small tattoo as part of the initiation. But she wasn’t prepared for what came next. Each woman was told to undress and lie on a massage table, while 3 others restrained her. According to one of them, their “master” instructed them to say: “Master, please brand me, it would be an honor.” A female doctor then used a cauterizing device to sear a small symbol below each woman’s hip. “I wept the whole time,” Sarah recalled. “I disassociated out of my body.” As Nxivm members reveal disturbing practices and fears of blackmail, the self-help organization has begun to unravel. Visit the link in our profile to read more. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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“It has to be completely authentic,” said the @abtofficial principal dancer @gillianemurphy of “Other… read more
“It has to be completely authentic,” said the @abtofficial principal dancer @gillianemurphy of “Other Dances” by #JeromeRobbins, part of ABT's fall season @lincolncenter. “There’s no sort of ‘performing’ for the audience. It’s all feeling the music and connecting with that and with your partner.” Choreographed in 1976 for #NataliaMakarova and #MikhailBaryshnikov, “Other Dances,” set to Chopin, is a celebration of classical ballet technique that leaves no room for mannerism. But as Gillian’s partner, @cory_stearns, put it, it provides a lot of space for “real artistic interpretation. It’s different than other pieces where you’re so focused on dancing the steps correctly. This is motivated by who you truly are. Nothing false.” Under the watchful eye of @isaguerin — the former @balletoperadeparis étoile (the company's highest rank), who is staging the work — the dancers are also learning to embrace stillness. “There’s a real intimacy to this ballet,” Gillian told the @nytimes writer @giadk. “The audience has to kind of lean forward and participate in what we’re feeling rather than us going out to them.” @_flodur made this video for #SpeakingInDance, our weekly series exploring the world of #dance. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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It’s hard to overemphasize Stephen Sondheim’s influence on American musical theater. As a young man,… read more
It’s hard to overemphasize Stephen Sondheim’s influence on American musical theater. As a young man, he was mentored by Oscar Hammerstein II of Rodgers and Hammerstein, who revolutionized musicals with “Oklahoma!” In that duo's hands, #musicaltheater matured into a storytelling art form. Sondheim built on their innovations by experimenting relentlessly with subject matter and form: from his early lyrics for “West Side Story” to more than 50 years’ worth of scores that have pushed boundaries. This week, #StephenSondheim — photographed here by @colin_dodgson — is featured in @tmagazine’s annual Greats issue. “He is musical theater’s greatest lyricist, full stop,” writes ‘Hamilton’ creator Lin-Manuel Miranda. “We now talk about his work the way we talk about Shakespeare or Dickens or Picasso.” #Sondheim was one of the first people #LinManuelMiranda told about his idea for a musical about Alexander Hamilton. “He threw back his head in laughter and clapped his hands,” Lin-Manuel writes in @tmagazine. “‘That is exactly what you should be doing. No one will expect that from you. How fantastic.’ That moment alone, the joy of surprising Sondheim, sustained me through many rough writing nights and missed deadlines.” Visit the link in our profile to read their #TGreats17 conversation. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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The lush #vineyards that dot the hillsides and valleys in Northern California — like these, photographed… read more
The lush #vineyards that dot the hillsides and valleys in Northern California — like these, photographed by @bryan.meltz near the town of Healdsburg — largely survived the fires that leveled neighborhood after neighborhood to the east. But the area’s #wine industry and the lodging, restaurant and construction sectors are now bracing for a different crisis. “The fire is only going to exacerbate the housing crisis,” said Wei-Ling Huber, president of @unitehere in the region. Sonoma County has some of the highest rents in the U.S. The question is whether workers — many undocumented immigrants — can find places to stay. Unlike other wildfire victims, those who are undocumented don’t qualify for assistance from FEMA. They also don’t qualify for unemployment and welfare benefits. “They’re asking $2,000, even $2,800 a month,” said Manuel Vieyra, who was paying $1,650 a month to rent a 3-bedroom house. “I don’t know what we’ll do.” Visit the link in our profile to read more. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Lifeless, listless and about to be facing an elimination game, the @yankees landed a 6-4 victory over… read more
Yankee Stadium
Lifeless, listless and about to be facing an elimination game, the @yankees landed a 6-4 victory over @astrosbaseball tonight that set Yankee Stadium rocking and evened the series at 2 games apiece. After being held to a lone hit for 6 innings, the #Yankees began to turn things around in the 7th. #AaronJudge (@thejudge44) blasted a solo homer off Lance McCullers (@lancemccullers43). That’s when the unraveling of the #Astros began. The @nytimes photographer @nytchangster took this photo of Todd Frazier (@flavafraz29) celebrating with Greg Bird (@_gregbird33) after the team’s win. The @yankees’ only hit before @thejudge44’s home run was @flavafraz29’s one-out bloop single to shallow right in the 3rd. Game 5: tomorrow. #⚾️ | © instagram.com/nytimes
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The musical affinity between certain composers and choreographers is like a magnetic force. The works… read more
The musical affinity between certain composers and choreographers is like a magnetic force. The works that result from this mutual attraction feel greater than the sum of their parts. The choreographer Alexei Ratmansky — on the left in this photo by @vincenttullo — has already created 5 ballets to the music of Leonid Desyatnikov, right, a Ukraine-born composer now based in St. Petersburg. “Songs of Bukovina,” which will premiere tomorrow at @abtofficial, will be the 6th. It’s also the 2nd time the choreographer — born in St. Petersburg, raised in Ukraine and now living in New York — has turned to Leonid’s work this year. “I think we share a lot of history, not only our own history but the history of the place and the culture that brought us up,” he said. Visit the link in our profile to read a conversation between the 2 artists — and to see photos of a rehearsal for “Songs of Bukovina.” | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Sonoma and Napa counties in California, where #wildfires continue to rage, are known for wine and agriculture.… read more
Sonoma and Napa counties in California, where #wildfires continue to rage, are known for wine and agriculture. But this is horse country, too. Many of the most celebrated — and valuable — horses in equine sports live here. The fires, which started on October 8, have destroyed thousands of buildings and killed dozens of people. As of Sunday night, thousands of horses had been displaced and 6 had been euthanized after sustaining severe burns or experiencing colic. Veterinarians expect both numbers to rise. “There are so many people unaccounted for, and that’s the same thing for the horses,” Natalie Zdimal, a veterinarian in the area, @malika_andrews. @jasonhenry took this photo of Corriendo Tau, an international hunter derby winner. #? Visit the link in our profile to see glimpses of the horse lovers working around the clock to move thousands of animals out of harm’s way. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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“It’s important to talk about inequality,” Amy Adams told @tmagazine. “But for me, where I feel most… read more
“It’s important to talk about inequality,” Amy Adams told @tmagazine. “But for me, where I feel most empowered is in educating myself and being, hopefully, a mentor for younger women.” Becoming a movie star can define a performer and brutally undermine her. If #AmyAdams has evaded the churn of celebrity culture, it’s partly because stardom came as it did. When “Enchanted” opened in 2007 she was 33, middle age in Hollywood years. At that point, she’d been honing her craft and overcoming rejection for years. Since then, of course, there have been juicier roles and steady acclaim and, of course, Oscar nominations. And yet, @manohladargis writes: “She seems of our earth, not one of those exotic creatures whose celebrity becomes so otherworldly that it edges into camp.” @tmagazine is featuring Amy Adams in its annual Greats issue, which is dedicated to celebrating people they admire. Part of her greatness as an actor, @manohladargis writes, is that she gives herself over to her roles so completely. “She doesn’t showboat, calling attention to her technique with histrionics and self-flattering moments, but instead surrenders herself to her characters. She builds histories for them.” Visit the link in our profile to read @manohladargis’s interview with #AmyAdams, who was photographed here by @collierschorrstudio, with styling by @jasonrider. #TGreats17 | © instagram.com/nytimes
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The Gowanus canal has long been a magnet for waste, like these books that were tossed on a piling near… read more
The Gowanus canal has long been a magnet for waste, like these books that were tossed on a piling near the Carroll Street Bridge — and later photographed by @stephensperanza. But the future is flowing in fast on the sleepy little canal, where the wilderness of urban decay that sprouted artists and then artisanal ice cream shops is being tidied and tamed. As much as the canal zone has been remade already, though, the next few years promise, or threaten, a different magnitude of change altogether. Last week, a dredging crane began clawing oily-smelling muck off the bottom: an early stage of a $500 million #Superfund cleanup. At the same time, NYC is spending about a billion dollars to reduce sewage discharge into the canal and street flooding around it. Most important, the city is preparing to unleash a force held largely at bay for the first 2 decades of the #Gowanus renaissance: residential development. Next year, officials expect to propose a broad plan that calls for, among other things, rezoning 43 blocks to allow high-rise buildings. Visit the link in our profile to take a walk around the #Gowanus canal with @andylocal2. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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@renaudphilippe photographed these wolf puppies playing at Zoo Académie, a zoo and training facility… read more
Zoo Académie
@renaudphilippe photographed these wolf puppies playing at Zoo Académie, a zoo and training facility about 2 hours from Montreal. To assure wolf pups that humans are tolerable, people must spend 24 hours a day, 7 days a week with them for weeks on end. Dog puppies, on the other hand, will quickly attach to any human within reach. Jacinthe Bouchard, Zoo Académie’s owner, has trained domestic and wild animals all over the world. This past spring she bred 2 litters of wolf pups. Then unusually bad flooding of the St. Lawrence threatened the den, so Jacinthe had to remove them at about 7 days old instead of the usual 2 weeks. Then began the arduous process of socializing the pups. As Jacinthe noted, “we don’t shower” in the early days, to let the pups get a clear sense of who they’re smelling. That’s important — both wolves and dogs go through a critical period when they learn who their friends and family are. With #wolves, that time is thought to start at about 2 weeks, when they’re deaf and blind. In dogs, it starts at about 4 weeks, when they can see, smell and hear. This shift in development might be key to their greater ability to connect with human beings. Visit the link in our profile to read more. #?? | © instagram.com/nytimes
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William Eggleston is widely considered one of modern photography’s most influential artists. His other… read more
Memphis, Tennessee
William Eggleston is widely considered one of modern photography’s most influential artists. His other lifelong passion, however, has remained more of a secret. “People know my photographs because they’re published in books and shown in galleries and museums and so forth, and yet I don’t perform music in public, ever — only in front of good friends who really want to hear it and who really listen,” said the 78-year-old, a prolific pianist. “Musik,” to be released on Friday by @secretlycanadian, will change that. The collection consists of instrumentals he performed on an 88-key Korg synthesizer in his home over the course of several years in the 1990s. It’s assertive and confident, with a swagger that might well be linked to the unpressured way it was recorded, to document impromptu playing. That sense of expressive, unrestrained spontaneity is a crucial component of William Eggleston’s quickly shot, uncontrived photographs as well. “I think there’s absolutely a link between music in general and what I do in photography,” he said. “I don’t know what it really is, but it’s there.” @_andrea_morales photographed #WilliamEggleston playing the #piano at his home in #Memphis. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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@damonwinter took this photo of 7-year-old Samuel Bradley on the White River near his family’s property… read more
@damonwinter took this photo of 7-year-old Samuel Bradley on the White River near his family’s property in northern Arkansas. Samuel’s dad, Dr. Lucas Bradley, took a job in the area because he and his wife, Karla, wanted to raise their family — 6 kids, with a 7th on the way — in a small town. Without a growing full-service hospital, though, they probably wouldn’t have moved to Baxter County. Baxter Regional Medical Center, where Lucas works as a neurosurgeon, is the area’s single largest employer. Since the Affordable Care Act passed, it has added 221 employees. The health sector accounts for 1 in 9 jobs nationwide, but 1 in 4 in Baxter County. For residents, then, the fight over the #AffordableCareAct is about both lives and livelihoods, access to care and to jobs. Lucas voted for President Trump and credits him with shaking up inside-the-Beltway cronyism. But he said the health care law had “benefited hospitals, patients and providers in the state of Arkansas.” There were, he said, “lots of parts in that bill that were done right, parts that were necessary.” There were significant shortcomings, too, he said, but they’re fixable. Visit the link in our profile to read more about a small town in Trump country with a big stake in health care. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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“I know who I am,” @nickiminaj told @tmagazine. “I am getting Nicki Minaj figured out with this album… read more
“I know who I am,” @nickiminaj told @tmagazine. “I am getting Nicki Minaj figured out with this album and I’m loving her.” @nickiminaj began her music career singing with various rappers and working odd jobs. Since then, she has demonstrated a discipline and intelligence that’s rare among other pop stars of her generation. As she prepares to release her 4th album — the title of which is, for now, a well-kept secret but is “super, super iconic” — @roxanegay74 interviewed her for @tmagazine’s annual Greats issue. As a person, @roxanegay74 writes, “I don’t know that anyone but her inner circle knows who Nicki Minaj really is.” This elusiveness is compounded by her catalog of performative alter egos, her use of accents and her dramatic makeup, outfits and wigs. “There is no point during our conversation where Minaj demonstrates anything but absolute self-awareness,” @roxanegay74 writes. “She pauses briefly before she answers my questions, as if calculating every possible outcome to everything she says. By the end of the interview, I am impressed by her fierce intelligence.” Visit the link in our profile to read the full interview with #NickiMinaj, who was photographed by @patrickdemarchelier and styled by @marieameliesauve. #tgreats17 | © instagram.com/nytimes
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When Hurricane Maria swept away the bridge that led in and out of Charco Abajo, a remote village in the… read more
Puerto Rico
When Hurricane Maria swept away the bridge that led in and out of Charco Abajo, a remote village in the mountainous inland of #PuertoRico, Carlos Ocasio and Pablo Perez Medina decided that they couldn’t  wait for help to arrive. When the wind and rain calmed, the welder and the retired handyman climbed off the edge of the bridge. They crossed the Vivi River and walked several miles to a hardware store, where they bought a cable, a metal harness and wheels. They built a pulley that now spans the gap where the bridge once was, and attached a shopping cart, after removing its legs and wheels, which they’ve been using to transfer food, water and supplies across the divide. @dennismanuel took this photo of Ramon Torres using the improvised pulley system. Though aid groups began to arrive a week after Carlos and Pablo set it up, Carlos and Pablo raised a sign to describe how it felt in #CharcoAbajo immediately after the storm. It reads “Campamento de los Olvidados,” Spanish for “Camp of the Forgotten.” Nearly a month after #HurricaneMaria devastated this island commonwealth, life remains a struggle. Visit the link in our profile to read more. | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Where in the world is @nytimestravel? The photographer @davidbtorch took this photo while on assignment… read more
Where in the world is @nytimestravel? The photographer @davidbtorch took this photo while on assignment for a story in this week’s issue. Where do you think he was when he captured this scene? #?? | © instagram.com/nytimes
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Shannon Mulcahy, 43, started working at a bearings plant in Indianapolis when she was 25. Men came and… read more
Shannon Mulcahy, 43, started working at a bearings plant in Indianapolis when she was 25. Men came and went. Houses were bought and lost. But her job was always there. Until now. She and her co-workers had gotten the news back in October: The factory was closing. Her job was moving to Mexico. Her boyfriend tried to console her. “We’re survivors,” he told her. “We’ll get by.” Her daughter, Nicole, wasn’t so sure. A high school senior, she had dreamed of being the first in her family to go to college. Figuring out how to pay for it kept her up at night. And Shannon’s 23-year-old son Bub depended on Shannon to help support his disabled 4-year-old daughter, Carmella, who has has a rare chromosomal disorder and had just barely survived a litany of major surgeries. Shannon had no idea what to do. She wished the new factory in Mexico would burn to the ground. She cried that night. And the next night. And the next. Then, that Monday, Shannon did the only thing she knew how. She put on her electric-blue eyeliner and went back to work. @alyssaschukar took this photo of Shannon, holding her granddaughter, Carmella. Watch our #InstagramStory to read more about Shannon and to see more of @alyssaschukar’s photos. | © instagram.com/nytimes